Your most important musical instrument and how it tunes your life

More than 300 years ago the French composer François Couperin recommended that children should begin studying instruments by the age of 6 or 7. He was right! Is studying music for children only? No! It can be of benefit at any age. In fact, it may be the fastest way to build skills in all four cerebral divisions. The study of music offers the type of challenging stimulation that can retard and sometimes even prevent the onset of symptoms commonly associated with the aging process (e.g., senility). In other words, it's rarely too late to begin!

SEMINAR DESCRIPTION

The brains of individuals who have studied music differ from the brains of those who have not. Recent PET Scans (Positron Emission Tomography) have confirmed that the corpus callosum (the largest of several bridge-highway of nerves connecting the two hemispheres) is 15% larger in adults who started playing the piano before the age of eight as compared with those who started later. Potentially this could result in a huge increase in the flow of information. Other studies found absolute or perfect pitch among 95% of individuals who started music study at age four or younger but in only 5% of those who began between age twelve and age fourteen. Children who receive music lessons were found to do better in arithmetic than a control group without music education. And on and on...

Is studying music for children only? No! It can be of benefit at any age. In fact, it may be the fastest way to build skills in all four divisions of the cerebrum. Music lessons offer the type of challenging stimulation that can retard and sometimes even prevent the onset of symptoms commonly associated with the aging process (e.g., senility). In other words, it's rarely too late to begin! Perception and performance is correlated with Taylor's "Who Am I?" Pyramid model. Includes information about relative energy expenditures during musical activities along with perception and performance.

Part 1: Universality and benefits in key areas that can accrue from the study of music
Part 2: The triune brain, triune ear, and the impact of downshifting
Part 3: Gender differences and impact of extroversion, ambiversion, and introversion
Part 4: Sensory Preference (with Sensory Preference Assessment) and innate brain bent

SUGGESTED TIME FRAME

The seminar can be presented in four 50-minute sessions.

A summary presentation can be presented in one 50-minute session.

TARGET AUDIENCE

Audiences who want to learn more about how the study of music can impact the brain, learning, and wellness.

SEMINAR OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of the seminar, participants should be able to:

  • List six benefits that can accrue from the study of music
  • Describe the relationship between a study of music and the development of the brain
  • Identify three potential advantages to beginning the study of music at an early age
  • Correlate perception and performance with sensory preference and brain bent
Arlene TaylorPresented by Arlene R. Taylor PhD
Brain Function Specialist, Realizations Inc

www.arlenetaylor.org

 

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