Comments by Dr. Taylor

Addictions are brain-reward habits that have run away with themselves.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Addictions begin in the brain. Think of them as an obsessed brain. If recovery occurs, that, too, happens in the brain.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Addictive behaviors are simply pieces of brain softwareusually habitsthat have run away with themselves.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Refuse to think of yourself as skidding down the slope called “aging.” Think of yourself as becoming more chronologically gifted—hopefully wiser in the process—hiking joyfully and gratefully across the mountain tops.
—Arlene R. Taylor

If you want to increase anti-aging benefits, alter your shopping habits to include more fresh fruits and vegetables and far fewer refined and processed foods.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Embrace growing older healthily by design and with gusto—many are denied the opportunity!  
—Arlene R. Taylor

Age is just a number, a matter of the mind—and if you don’t mind, it really doesn’t matter. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Use your brain by design to improve your health, enhance your relationships, live authentically, increase your options for success, retard the onset of symptoms of aging, and thrive!
—Arlene R. Taylor

Age is relative and doesn’t matter a whole lot—unless you lose your brain because you didn’t use it. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

All parts of the brain and body have a function and purpose. If used in balance, they can become well developed and age more slowly. If used inappropriately and out of balance, they can drain your energy and accelerate the aging process.  
—Arlene R. Taylor

All parts of the brain and body have function and purpose. If exercised in balance and used in moderation, they can age more slowly. If not, they can drain your energy and accelerate the aging process.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Anger, a core emotion, is a signal that one or more of your personal boundaries have been invaded (e.g., mental, physical, emotional, sexual, financial, spiritual, social). It provides energy to create, implement, reassess/reset appropriate personal limits. Without anger you may lack the motivation and energy to take appropriate corrective action or you may become complacent and begin to tolerate the intolerable. Unmanaged anger can lead to bitterness, illness, injury, and even death. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Bitterness, hostility, and unforgiveness are hungry parasites that leave little if anything for the brain or heart to eat.
—Arlene R. Taylor

For every day you allow yourself to remain in a state of anger, you have given up a day of health that can impact the rest of your life.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Apathy is not an emotion in and of itself. Rather it represents a state of exhausted emotional overwhelm often due to unmanaged emotions. Human beings rarely commit suicide when in a state of apathy—they do not have enough energy.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

You are under no obligation to accept any invitation to an argument.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Parental arguing is very stressful to children, tending to make them feel unsafe. It can be seen in stomach aches at school. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Age is relative and really does not matter a whole lot—unless you lose your brain because you did not take good care of it.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Perhaps the greatest loss you can experience in life is the loss of who you were intended to be innately—and the authentic realness you never lived in all its thriving fullness.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Most children arrive in this world authentically real—the challenge is to remain authentically real in adulthood. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

True intimacy is simply the ability to be real, to be who you are innately, and to let others see you in all your authenticity.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Instead of asking who do others want me to be, discover who you are innately, for yourself, and start living authentically.
—Arlene R. Taylor

It costs you something to live authentically, especially if your giftedness or “bent,” does not align with stereotypical expectations. Steadfast commitment is the price. —Arlene R. Taylor

You are the only person who is qualified for the job of being the real, authentic you. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

When your behaviors are failing to provide positive outcomes, it doesn’t require rocket science to figure out that it would be wise to change your behaviors. If you keep on doing the same behaviors, you will keep on getting the same outcomes.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Owning your own personal behaviors does not mean you will always like your every word, thought, or deed—it does mean you take responsibility for them.
—Arlene R. Taylor

If you do not know who you are innately, you are at risk for believing who others say you are.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

One body is leased to you for your lifetime and while some parts are replaceable, they rarely function like the original.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Your body must carry your brain around. Take excellent care of your body so it can do this job safely and reliably.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Boredom is a state of mind. Your brain is capable of thinking of any number of ideas—but to do that, you will need to change what you are currently thinking.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Boredom is the brain’s way of begging you to “please get a life!”
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Boundaries can be defined as the physical, mental, emotional, sexual, spiritual, financial, educational, etc., parameters or limits you set for yourself within a relationship; what you will accept and what you will not. They allow you to protect yourself and to achieve appropriate and healthy self-care.
—Arlene R. Taylor

It is quite basic: either you set and implement your own boundaries or others will set them for you—which usually means none, especially if they wish to control you.  
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Everything begins in your brain—period.
—Arlene R. Taylor

There has never been a brain on planet earth exactly like yours, nor will there ever be again. You are the only person who can live your giftedness—and if you fail to do so, the universe will be deprived of what only your brain can offer!
—Arlene R. Taylor

Although humans are more alike than they are different, each brain is different—no two are alike, not even the brains of identical twins. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Your brain can be like a bad neighborhood—a scary place to be in the dark—if you let it.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Use your brain or lose your mind.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Since everything begins in the brain, it makes sense for you to figure out how yours functions—best.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Your brain is your greatest resource. Use it to achieve health, happiness, and success!
—Arlene R. Taylor

Brain breathe every morning to boot up your brain like you’d boot up your computer. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Your brain is a work in progress. What type of progress are you choosing to make?
—Arlene R. Taylor

Your character lives in your brain. It’s what you do when people are looking and when no one is looking; the way you behave when you think you’ll never be found out.
—Arlene R. Taylor

What can your brain help you accomplish? You’ll never know how high you can fly ’til you spread your wings and try!
—Arlene R. Taylor

You become what goes into your brain. If quality in, it is quality out.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Go where other brains have not gone and leave footprints for them to follow.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Your brain works best when your life is in balance, which requires evaluation and choices.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Your brain believes whatever you tell it about yourself, and it will work hard to turn it into a self-fulfilling prophecy.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Expend your brain resources wisely. Avoiding putting your giftedness into another’s pocket that is filled with holes—and will be wasted.  
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Every brain has a “bent”—talent or innate giftedness. It likely reflects and innate energy advantage in one of the four cerebral divisions. Tasks aligned with your brain bent tend to require lower energy expenditures. With practice, you can often achieve an outstanding level of competence.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Identify your brain’s bent because it has to do with energy and excellence.
—Arlene R. Taylor

"Bent" rhymes with "dent." And whether you follow your brain bent (or not) can result in a smaller or larger dent in your energy bank!
—Arlene R. Taylor

Your brain knows how it functions most effectively and tries to convey this to you. Pay attention to what you procrastinate. Often those tasks represent what is most energy-intensive for your brain. It will do almost anything to avoid unwelcome energy-fatiguing tasks, including snacking, addictive behaviors such as smoking, spending excessive time on social media sites or playing video games, et cetera.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Enjoy your brain's innate giftedness and avoid apologizing for tasks it finds energy intensive—everyone has some. you are unique on this planet and can learn to thrive in your own way.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Brain breathe every morning to boot up your brain like you boot up your computer. Inhale to a count of four; hold to a count of twelve; exhale through pursed lips to a count of eight.
—Arlene R. Taylor

You are leased one brain to last your lifetime on Planet Earth and there are no replacements. Estimates are that 70 percent of how long it lasts and in what condition, is linked with lifestyle choices.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Keep doing what you have always done—and you will keep getting the same outcomes. If they are not positive, change what you are doing.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Changing your brain can change your body.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Brain plasticity can help you make needed positive changes.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Be the change you would like to see in others.
—Arlene R. Taylor

You cannot change your past, but you do possess the power to alter your future.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Life is little more than a continuum of small choices¾miniscule decisions. The consequences you experience result from their cumulative effect. Make each small choice with an awareness of the potential long-term result of that decision.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Positive change requires awareness, choice, and building skills. It does not happen by accident.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Living involves choosing. Be clear that not making a choice is still a choice in and of itself.
—Arlene R. Taylor

The choices you make today are critical. Not only have you exchanged a day of your life for them, but they will impact your brain and immune system next month, next year, and perhaps forever.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Today’s choices determine your future.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Choose to speak kindly and affirmingly to others. Keep your bad moods separate from speaking negative, unkind words separate. A mood is just a feeling that hangs around for a while. You can change a mood by changing your thoughts because feelings always follow thoughts. What you cannot retract are your unkind words.
—Arlene R. Taylor

"Yes" and "no" are critically important words. They have altered the course of many lives forever—especially during teens and early adulthood.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Until you identify, understand, honor, and make peace with who you are innately, you will likely find it difficult to be content with what you have or with anyone else.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Avoid defining creativity too narrowly. Every brain is creative in its own way. Inventors are simply individuals who use their creativity in ways that had not been done before.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Although humans are more alike than they are different, differences do exist. You can allow yourself to become frustrated with the differences or you can enjoy them.
—Arlene R. Taylor

No one chooses the color of their skin, any more than they choose their blood or brain—which, incidentally, are the same color in everyone regardless of skin tones.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Disgust is an emotional motivator. It can surface in combination with any core emotion and serves to increase the strength of the emotion and/or of a resulting action or behavior.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Think of emotions as an energy source. Without an energy source, a clock would be motionless. Humans would be “motionless” without emotions to give them information and energy. You can experience every emotion without emoting (e.g., expressing it) or acting upon it immediately.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Emotions can be your Achilles’ heel or your Aladdin’s lamp.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Core emotion are all positive. They include joy and the three protective emotions: anger, fear, and sadness. The behaviors exhibited around the protection emotions may be negative, however.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Emotions give you information, connecting the subconscious with the conscious. Learn to recognize what they are trying to convey and use the information to make positive choices.;
—Arlene R. Taylor

Pay attention when a core emotion arises in your brain and body. You need not emot or take immediate action (unless you are in danger), but file away what you learned for the next time you either find yourself in a similar situation or want to prevent it.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Pay attention when a core emotion (joy, anger, fear, sadness) arises in your brain and body. You need not emot or take immediate action (unless you are in danger), but do remember what you learned for the next time you either find yourself in a similar situation or want to prevent one.
—Arlene R. Taylor

All emotions are positive, and some are also protective. Each core emotion is designed to help you become aware of specific sensory stimuli and to manage specific situations appropriately.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

You pay for everything in life, in energy if nothing else. Part of maturing involves deciding the price you are willing to pay for something—because nothing is free. —Arlene R. Taylor

Distilled to the bottom line your basic medium of exchange is energy. Not money, not possessions, not birthright or position, not even talent. Energy.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Epigenetics is everything that is not genetics—basically your lifestyle choices. Estimates are it accounts for 70 percent of your health, level of wellness, and longevity.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

EQ is a set of skills that help you recognize emotions quickly, manage them effectively, and choose the behviors you want to exhibit.
—Arlene R. Taylor

When you have been asked for your opinion and have given it as honestly as possible, high Emotional Intelligence skills allow you to be relatively indifferent to whether it is taken or not and avoid badgering others to embrace your position.
—Arlene R. Taylor

“JOT” behaviors represent low levels of Emotional Intelligence and contribute to conflict and misunderstanding: Jumping to conclusions, Overreacting, and Taking things personally.
—Arlene R. Taylor

AAA is a technique to help interrupt or avoid JOT behaviors. Ask questions to clarify. Act calmly to avoid overreacting. Alter your perception of the event.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Reframe or viewing a situation from a different perspective can be a helpful strategy. Sometimes you may now see the “gift,” identify something valuable you learned, or even glimpse the metaphoric silver lining.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Euphoria—intense joy—is a signal that something you consider very pleasurable is happening. It provides energy to experience special moments at an intense level but is not designed to be sustained over long periods of time. Without euphoria you may or under-appreciate special moments, and your life may lack appropriate spice and excitement. Unmanaged euphoria can lead to a search for activities that provide a continual high (e.g., addictive behaviors) through direct or indirect self-medication that alters your neurochemistry—pseudo joy.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Move it and use it—or lose it. Keep your muscles strong through physical activity; keep your brain strong through mental activity. Movin’ and groovin’ as the kids would say.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Make physical and mental exercise a habit—then exercise that habit your entire life.
—Arlene R. Taylor

According to researcher, physical exercise is one of the most beneficial things you can do for your brain.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

It has been said that you tend to get in life not what you deserve but what you expect. Expect your best, give it your best, do whatever it takes to reach your best—and give thanks for the opportunity.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Define expectations for you and your brain. Base them on innate giftedness, what you are passionate about, your mission in life, and how to give back¾to leave your corner of the world a better place than you found it and people better off for having crossed paths with you.
—Arlene R. Taylor

People generally know themselves better than you do. Listen to what they tell you. Believe them. It is unhelpful to keep expecting them to be something other than they choose to be—no matter how much you would like that to happen.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Fear has an antidote—it is gratitude. Use it!
—Arlene R. Taylor

Fear is a signal that you may be in some type of danger: actual or imagined. It provides energy to take appropriate protective action for you and/or for others. Without fear you may be unable to protect yourself or your loved ones adequately. Unmanaged fear—actual or imagined—can kill ideas, undermine confidence, escalate into phobias, and create immobility.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

If you want to change the way you feel you must change the way you think, because feelings follow thoughts.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Forgiveness is simply agreeing to give up your right to have another person pay retribution for what your brain perceives that individual did to you.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Unforgiveness handicaps your future.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Forgiveness makes it possible for you to move from a victim position to one of survivor. A victim position leaves you seething with resentment. A survivor position allows you to retain the memories—without their sting—and take positive steps for long-term positive change.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Anger, bitterness, hostility, and unforgiveness are ravenous parasites that gorge until there is nothing left for the brain or heart to eat.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Forgiveness involves healthy selfishness. It is less about the other person and more about freeing up energy that has been devoted to maintaining an enemy outpost in your head—energy that can now be used to help you be healthier, happier, and more successful.
—Arlene R. Taylor

When you allow yourself to hate, you create an enemy outpost in your brain—free space in the name of the one you hate that costs you a lot to maintain.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Sometimes the most difficult person to forgive is yourself. Give yourself permission to forgive yourself and heal.
—Arlene R. Taylor

The one who forgives benefits the most; the one who refuses to forgive suffers the most.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

I’d rather have a few genuine “brain mates” I can trust than a plethora of “friends” that I cannot.
—Arlene R. Taylor

I have learned that true friendship is not necessarily about the people whom you have known the longest. It’s about the ones who hung in there with you through thick and thin, who never left your side emotionally, who accepted you just as you are, who have your back, and who grew with you.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Understanding more about gender differences doesn’t make them go away. The knowledge you gain can empower you to identify options and make collaborative choices that honor those differences without either taking them personally or allowing them to interfere with achieving positive outcomes. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Although humans are more alike than they are different, differences do exist. You can allow yourself to become frustrated by them or have fun and enjoy them.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Choose the other parent of your child(ren) with care. Estimates are that genes and chromosomes impact least 30 percent of your child’s health and wellness. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Every person needs a dream and every dream needs a plan. Willpower can help you turn your dream into reality.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Craft a goal for yourself and do something every single day to move toward it.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Give thanks in all circumstances. That does not mean that you are giving thanks for every circumstance. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

There is always something your brain can find for which to be thankful.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Gratitude is the antidote for fear—be sure to keep a ready supply at hand. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Think of something for which you are thankful in all circumstances. This can help the brain stay "upshifted."
—Arlene R. Taylor

Gratitude is a choice. The more you identify things for which to be thankful, the stronger that habit becomes.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Waste no time in mindless grieving because it is over. Be happy that it happened at all—that your paths even crossed, and that you were able to spend some quality time together.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Guilt is an emotional interrupter. Likely a learned reaction, it can motivate you to course correct when you have made a mistake—or at least apologize if what you did cannot be corrected. Unhealthy guilt tries to make you feel that you yourself are a mistake, worthless, and nothing can be done about it. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

The true power of habits is rarely felt until they are too strong to be altered easily.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Addictive behaviors are simply pieces of brain software, habits that have run away with themselves.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Choose carefully what you do once—your brain has already laid down the outline for a piece of software, so it is easier for you to do it a second time and a third, etc.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Studies show that within about three years you are at risk of picking up the habits of the four or five people who you hang out with—negative or positive. Choose your friends carefully.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Happiness is a personal choice. It begins with gratitude.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Happiness and life satisfaction are not synonymous although they impact each other. Happiness involves affective wellbeing while life satisfaction involves cognitive wellbeing.
—Arlene R. Taylor

A truly happy person is defined less by a specific set of circumstances and more by a specific set of attitudes. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Happiness is a choice. Regardless of your circumstances, there is always something your brain can find for which to be happy.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Your health rarely improves by chance. It can improve by incremental positive change.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Good health is merely the slowest possible rate at which you can die—while remaining in relatively good shape.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Many misunderstand that a balanced life, appropriate self-care, and good health, begin at home with yourself. As a physician once said, “Everyone is here to serve—but none was ever intended to be the main course.”
—Arlene R. Taylor

You are what you eat and drink. Garbage in; garbage out. What you do today determines how you look and how you function next month and next year. How do you want to look and how do you want to function?
—Arlene R. Taylor

Plants and animals cannot survive without sunlight; neither can you. Flood your home with it but be prudent about spending large amounts of time in direct sun without protecting your skin and eyes from the ultraviolet rays. The sun can kill as well as heal. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Your brain and body must last your entire lifetime and one without the other is less than half the picture. Some replacements exist but they are rarely as good as the originals. Learn how to take very good care of both your brain and body—then keep doing it for the rest of your life. You and everyone you know stand to benefit! 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Use your brain by design to improve your health, retard the onset of symptoms of aging, and thrive!
—Arlene R. Taylor

You only get one brain and body for your sojourn on planet earth. Learn how to take good care of them—and do it consistently for life. Both you and your loved ones stand to benefit!
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Hope is perceiving options despite being surrounded by negativity that would have you believe there are none.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Sometimes the light of hope dims, flickers, and goes out. Flat out dies. Sometimes, it can be rekindled by a spark from another person who relights the light of hope.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Hugging is a heart-to-heart release of anandamide—an endogenous substance that resembles marijuana. Hug whenever you can. Make it your "drug of choice." 
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Humor is believed to be a mental faculty housed in the right cerebral hemisphere. It must be developed and honed if one wants to possess a good sense of humor.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Cheerfulness without genuine humor can be a most trying façade.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

No one on this planet can live your giftedness but you. And if you fail to do so, the universe will forever be deprived of what only you can offer. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Enjoy your brain's innate giftedness and avoid apologizing for tasks it finds energy intensive. You are unique on this planet and you can learn to thrive in your own way.
—Arlene R. Taylor

If you don’t know who you are innately, you are at risk for believing who others say you are. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Until you identify, understand, make peace with, and learn to like who you are innately, you will find it difficult to be content with what you have at any stage of your journey.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Rather than asking, “Who do others want me to be,” discover who you are innately and live authentically.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Joy (a core emotion) is an emotional signal that life basically is going well and that you have tools to help you manage when problems arise. It provides energy to live life to its fullness. It is the only core emotion that does not result in negative outcomes when maintained over time. Without joy you may be unable to become the balanced, contented, productive individual you were intended to be. Pseudo or false joy can lead to addictions, obsessions, compulsions, a sense of unreality, frustration, and even depression.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Sometimes amid life’s challenges you may hear music, perhaps a fragment of a song, someone whistling, a bird singing, or even a kind word—and be pleasantly surprised by joy!
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Knowledge is powerful. The right kind is empowering. The wrong kind is crippling.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Knowledge differs from information. Knowledge is the practical application of relevant data, including your experiences with the information.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Laughter is a “sound” that emanates from Broca’s Area in the left frontal lobe of the brain—the same part of the brain that houses audible speech. You can “say” a lot through the type of laughter.
—Arlene R. Taylor

The sound of shared laughter may not be as loud as a clap of thunder, but its echo can be heard even farther and can last a great deal longer.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Laugh often and mirthfully. Laughter may wrinkle your face, but the absence of laughter may wrinkle your brain and heart instead.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Life is a canvas. Laughter is the paint. Splash on as much paint as possible!
—Arlene R. Taylor

A commonality among people I love to spend time with is that they have a great sense of humor and laugh a lot.
—Arlene R. Taylor

It is almost impossible to remain angry with another person if you share mirthful laughter together.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Mirthful laughter really is the best medicine. Benefits to your brain and body are myriad.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Genuine and effective leaders rarely start out to be “a leader.” They set out to make a difference—in people’s lives, in the world. Rarely is it about the role or the title or the recognition or the wealth. It is about making a difference.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

In adulthood, individuals largely choose whether they want to learn. Therefore, my goal is to make people think—and maybe by thinking about the brain in a new way, some will choose to learn. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Everyone has something to learn and everyone has something to teach. Fortunately, you can do both at the same time!
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

What legacy will you leave behind you? Create a legacy of caring. Make a difference in someone’s life. Touch a soul. Carve hope on a heart. Make their life a little bit better because your paths crossed.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Your life is a book. Birth is the first page, death the last. You choose the other pages. Love is the cover—it warms your heart, stimulates your brain, and holds your book together. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Learning life’s lessons is less about what happens to you and more about what you do with what happens to you.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Everyone has something to learn and everyone has something to teach. Fortunately, you can do both at the same time.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Owning your own behaviors does not mean that you will always like everything you think, say, or do—it does mean you take responsibility for them.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Human beings tend to return to environments in which they feel comfortable; environments they perceive to be nurturing, validating, affirming, and accepting.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Every person needs a dream and every dream needs a plan. Willpower can help you turn your dream into reality.
—Arlene R. Taylor

In general, people tend to treat themselves the way they were treated—and treat others the way they treat themselves.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Life is like a mobile. When one-piece moves, the pattern of the entire mobile moves.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Life is a continuum of small choices—miniscule decisions. The consequences you experience result from their cumulative effect. My best guess is that genuine maturity involves the practice of making each small choice with an awareness of the potential long-term result of that decision.
—Arlene R. Taylor

To some degree we peer at life through a mist, viewing things as if in a fog. We see things more as we are, from our own perspective, and less as they really are.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Your life rarely improves by chance; it can improve by incremental positive change.
—Arlene R. Taylor

You can solve problems successfully only when you use thinking that differs from what you used when you became part of the problem.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Life satisfaction is linked with longevity.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Life satisfaction and happiness are not synonymous although they impact each other. Happiness involves affective wellbeing while life satisfaction involves cognitive wellbeing.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

In this, the age of the brain, a Longevity Lifestyle is your most effective maintenance program. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

You can learn to like almost anything. Learn to like what is good for you—grab the opportunity to stay healthier and younger for longer!
—Arlene R. Taylor

A Longevity Lifestyle Matters—but it doesn’t happen by accident.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Developing a lifestyle that helps you stay healthier and younger for longer, gives you more time to share what only your brain can offer.
—Arlene R. Taylor

The best time to begin living a Longevity Lifestyle was yesterday. If you missed that window, the next best time is today!   
—Arlene R. Taylor

A lifestyle involves personal choice. Work on yourself and role-model healthy choices. If a longevity lifestyle “looks good on you,” others may choose to embrace it.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Love can neither be dictated or forced. You can never make someone love you. The sooner one learns that, the fewer the disappointments.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Understanding more about the brain and gender differences does not make them go away. The knowledge can empower you to identify options and make collaborative choices that honor those differences without either taking them personally or allowing them to interfere with achieving positive outcomes.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Perhaps primarily due to socialization, males often move to anger when emotions of fear or sadness arise, whether anger is the appropriate emotion for the situation at hand. If that happens the male may be unable to grieve successfully as sadness is the appropriate emotion related to loss.
—Arlene R. Taylor

In general, females have been socialized against exhibiting and sometimes even of recognizing anger in themselves. They send to identify with sadness for the emotions of anger or fear. Because if this, females may be a risk for tolerating intolerable situations, as anger is the emotion designed to signal the individual’s boundaries are being or have been breached.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Memory and imagination are twins. Memory is the historical diary of where you have been; imagination is the creative map for where you are headed.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Others may not remember exactly what you said, or did, or even how you looked, but their brains likely will remember how they felt when around you.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Mentors cannot do it for you. The best of mentors, however, seem somehow able to "see around the corner" and "visualize beyond the next mountain." They help you plot a trajectory—get you jump-started on that unrepeatable and rewarding journey that is your life.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Vehicles create traffic, which then impacts the vehicles—facilitating or impeding their movement. Brain creates mind, which then can impact the brain—facilitating or impeding its functions.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

The most important things you will ever say are those you say to yourself each day.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Everything starts with a thought. Are yours negative or positive, discouraging or affirming, hopeless or empowering? You choose.
—Arlene R. Taylor

A mindset of gobble ‘till you wobble or glutton ‘till you unbutton or binge ‘till you cringe or scarf ‘till you barf moves you away from—not toward—a balanced brain-based Longevity Lifestyle.
—Arlene R. Taylor

You are the only person who can change your mindset.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

All human brains make mistakes—some choose to learn from them.
—Arlene R. Taylor

It has been said that those who are truly successful are able to recover from a mistake without loss of enthusiasm.
—Arlene R. Taylor

I have learned as much from mistakes as from successes.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Mistakes are golden opportunities to begin again with more awareness and hopefully more wisdom!
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Choose to keep your bad moods and unkind words separate. A mood is just a feeling that hangs around for a while. You can change a mood by changing your thoughts because feelings always follow thoughts. What you cannot change are your unkind words. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Study music! Current research is helping to demystify the brain-music connection and adding to the body of knowledge related to distinct advantages associated with the study of music.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Sometimes amid life’s challenges you may hear music, perhaps just a fragment of a song, someone whistling, a bird singing—and be surprised by joy!
—Arlene R. Taylor

Current research is helping to demystify the brain-music connection. It is also pointing out distinct advantages associated with the study of music—over an entire lifetime.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

In most cases, obesity reflects lifestyle choices. That’s actually good news because it means you have a choice.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Opportunities are never lost. Someone else just picks up on the ones you missed and walks through open doors you ignored.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Human beings tend to peer at life through a mist, seeing things from their own brain’s perspective and less as things really are. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Learning life’s lessons is less about what happens to you and more about how you respond to what happens to you—and what you do with it.
—Arlene R. Taylor

If you do not know who you are innately, you are at risk for believing who others say you are.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Applying what I have learned about the brain in general—and mine more specifically—has improved my life in every way imaginable. I can now thrive by design! My goal is to provide brain-function resources that you can use to improve your life, too.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

No one gives you personal power. You already possess it because of your brain’s innate giftedness. Just stop giving it away.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Feeling powerless? Stop giving yours away! No one hands you power; you already possess it based on your brain’s innate giftedness. Start owning what is already yours and use it to be more successful.
—Arlene R. Taylor

You cannot change your past, but you do possess the power to alter your future.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

You can solve problems successfully only when you use thinking that differs from what you used when you became part of the problem. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

How others treat you reveal who they are as individuals. How you treat others reveals who you are as an individual.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Avoid viewing others as a “project you can fix.” Generally, that is a dead-end road. They get mad because you are trying to fix them, and you get frustrated because they aren’t getting fixed.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Human beings tend to return to environments in which they feel comfortable and perceive to be nurturing, validating, and accepting.
—Arlene R. Taylor

People generally know themselves better than you do. Listen to what they tell you. Believe them. Positive change requires awareness, choice, and building skills—on their part. It is unhelpful to keep expecting them to be something other than they choose to be. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Sadness (a core emotion) is a signal that you have experienced some type of loss, tangible or intangible. It provides energy to grieve losses, heal past woundedness, and recover (feel better). Without sadness you may fail to recover from your losses and/or grieve successfully. Sadness may or may not trigger tears. Unmanaged sadness can suppress immune system function, may decrease levels of serotonin, and can lead to depression and/or immobility or even apathy. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

Select your close friends carefully. Studies show that within about three years you are at risk of picking up the habits of the four or five people who you hang out with—negative or positive.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Reputation takes a long time to build but can be destroyed in a nanosecond.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Reputation come from your character: what you do when people are looking and when no one is looking; how you behave when you believe the chances of being found out is minimal.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Risk is a two-sided coin. One side involves a calculated decision based on analysis of the known facts but without a guarantee of success; the other involves a blind leap into the darkness with no thought for the danger or for a solution. The calculated decision is a better bet. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Sadness—a core emotion—is a signal that you have experienced a loss, actual or imagined. Sadness provides energy on a temporary basis to help discharge painful feelings, grieve losses, heal past woundedness, recover, and return to a state of feeling better.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Without sadness you may fail to recover from your losses and/or grieve successfully.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Prolonged or unmanaged sadness can suppress immune system function leading to illness; may decrease levels of serotonin that helps with mood; and can lead to despair, immobility, and apathy—or to depression and even suicidal thinking.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Typically, people tend to treat others the way they were treated—sometimes they continue to treat themselves that way, too. This can be positive or negative.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Healthy selfishness involves “putting your mask on first” so you can genuinely help others.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Self-care begins with yourself. As one physician put it, “We are all here to serve—we were never intended to be the main course.”
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

The most important things you will ever say are the words you say to yourself each day.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Your brain believes what you tell it about yourself, and it will work hard to turn it into a self-fulfilling prophecy. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

You are the only person who can change your self-talk. Sometimes just doing that is what makes all the difference in the world.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Learn to tell the difference between the sensations of thirst and hunger—drink water when you are thirsty and eat food when you are physiologically hungry. Many eat for both hunger and thirst.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Human beings are often most comfortable when in environments that acknowledge their sensory preference and provision for it.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Shame is an emotional interrupter. Likely a learned reaction (often from childhood), it can alert you to having exhibited a behavior outside desirable norms. Unhealthy shame tries to get you to believe that you are so flawed you don’t deserve to exist.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Healthy shame reminds you that you have made a mistake—because you are human. Unhealthy shame says that you are a mistake.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Your brain works hard helping you see, hear, smell, feel, think, imagine, and do. Give it a break—give it the amount of sleep it requires to get all its housekeeping and repair chores completed.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Parts of your brain work harder while you sleep than when you are awake. Lose sleep? Some of your brain’s jobs may not get done, sort of like a cleaning service that keeps leaving early.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Lack of sufficient sleep for your brain is said to be independently linked with longevity.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Physical strength is measured by what you can carry; mental strength by what you can learn; and spiritual strength by the spirit with which you live life.
—Arlene R. Taylor

The spirit with which you live life is one definition of spirituality.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Learning life’s lessons is less about what happens to you and more about what you think about what happens to you, the importance or weight you place upon it—and how you choose to respond.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Only about 20% of negative stress is due to the event or situation; 80% is due to what you think about it. You may not be able to do much about the 20 percent. A quintessential 20:80 Rule. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

It has been said that those who are truly successful are able to recover from a mistake without loss of enthusiasm.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Opportunities are never lost. Someone else picks up on the ones you miss and walks through open doors you ignored.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Genuine success in life is more likely to occur when you understand your brain’s innate giftedness and match most of your life’s activities with what your brain does energy-efficiently.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Use your brain by design for success. Go where other brains have not ventured and leave brainprints for them to follow.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Successful living requires that you "examine" your brain and your heart on a regular basis—no matter how challenging that may be.Are they in sync or at war with each other?
—Arlene R. Taylor

Success is knowing who you are, being who you are, doing what you know you can do, and refusing to succumb to input from those who continually tell you what you cannot do.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Aim higher to get farther. It is a bit like rainbows—typically you must look up to find them.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Use your brain by design to increase your options for success,
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Surprise is an emotional motivator and can arise in combination with any core emotion. It serves to increase the strength of the emotion and/or of a resulting action or behavior.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Everything starts with a thought. Negative or positive, discouraging or affirming, hopeless or empowering. You choose the ones you hang onto.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Henry Ford nailed it when he said, “If you think you can or you think you can’t, you’re right.” What do you think you can?
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

You are unique on this planet and can learn to thrive in your own way. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Time is precious. Quality time is the most valuable gift you can give to yourself and to others—it is the one gift that only you can give.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Completing unfinished business simply means addressing issues or concerns that unresolved or that you have not yet come to terms with.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Unfinished business can involve situations where the younger generation takes on issues that older generations were unable or unwilling to come to grips with. Unresolved, these issues can be handicapping for a lifetime.
—Arlene R. Taylor

The past is the best predictor of the future. Learn all you can about your history and make informed choices going forward. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

The sensations of thirst and hunger are quite similar. Learn to tell them apart—drink water when you are thirsty and eat food when you are physiologically hungry.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Your brain must have water to live. Drink plenty of pure water every day to keep your brain from shrinking and shriveling like an old apple and pulling away from your skull.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Unless medically contraindicated, it is wise to drink enough water each day to achieve one or two pale urines.
—Arlene R. Taylor

Drink plenty of pure water to keep your brain cells from shrinking and shriveling. Avoid dehydration like the plague—it is linked with an increased risk for dementia.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Willpower is a mental faculty designed to help you persist in developing and implementing a new behavior. 
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

Wisdom is learned—or not.
—Arlene R. Taylor

The gradual accumulation of wisdom can be a positive reward for biting your tongue and listening when you were sorely tempted to talk.
—Arlene R. Taylor

 

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