Subtle effects on some transplant recipient’s consciousness and personality is thought to be due to the infor-energetic cellular memories that come with the transplanted heart. (Pearsall, Paul, PhD. The Heart’s Code. NY: Random House,Inc., 1998, pp 72-73)

The Fifth Force or “L” energetic intelligence, nonlocal and invisible, may be involved when donated cells seem to “remember” where they came from. (Pearsall, Paul, PhD. The Heart’s Code. NY: Broadway Books, 1998, pp l40-44)

Every cell has a “mind.” Tissue cells moved from one body to another carry memories with them that can impact the second body (e.g., kidney transplant patients often report new food preferences). (Sylvia, Claire, with William Novak. A Change of Heart. NY: Little, Brown and Company, 1997, pp 211-221)

A heart transplant recipient’s surprisingly accurate dreams about her donor, alteration in food tastes, and many other changes offer clues about the possibilities of cellular memories. (Pearsall, Paul, PhD. The Heart’s Code. NY: Broadway Books,1998, p 11)

Transplant recipients (e.g., heart, liver, kidney) can begin to participate in cellular memories from the donor, released when the tissues were placed inside another body. (Chopra, Deepak,MD. Ageless Body, Timeless Mind. NY: Harmony Books, 1993, pp 22-24)

The accuracy of memories that often accompany transplants is beyond coincidence or chance. (Lipton,Bruce, PhD. The Biology of Belief. CA: Mountain of Love / Elite Books, 2005, pp 190-192)

Study by Schwartz and Russek (1997, 1998a, 1998b): There is evidence that the recipient's rejection process of a transplanted organ, may reflect not only rejection of the material organ (the cellular component), but also rejection of the donated cellular memory (the information and energy stored within the transplanted donor cells). (D' Alberto, Attilio. Cellular Memory and ZangFu Theory.) (http://med-vetacupuncture.org/english/articles/attilio/cellmem1.html)

A heart transplant recipient’s surprisingly accurate dreams about her donor, alteration in food tastes, and many other changes offer clues about the possibilities of cellular memories. (Pearsall, Paul, PhD. The Heart’s Code. NY: Broadway Books, 1998, p 11)

Half of a cell’s nucleus is DNA, the other half involves regulatory proteins that form a type of “sleeve” over the DNA. These protein scan be modified by the environment. Epigenetic “dials” can create more than2,000 variations of proteins from the same gene blueprint, which can alter the gene’s impact. (Lipton, Bruce, PhD. The Biology of Belief. CA: Mountain of Love / Elite Books, 2005, pp 67-70)

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