Cellular Memory

A study has shown that childhood abuse (defined in this study as "sexual contact, severe physical abuse and/or severe neglect") leads to epigenetic modifications of glucocorticoid receptor expression, which play a role in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity. Maternal care influences hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) function in the rat through epigenetic programming of glucocorticoid receptor expression. In humans, childhood abuse alters HPA stress responses and increases the risk of suicide. These findings translate previous results from rat to humans and suggest a common effect of parental care on the epigenetic regulation of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor expression. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19234457)

Proteins interact with chromosomal elements, termed Cellular Memory Modules (CMMs). The switching of such CMMs to an active state during (during larval stages in this experiment) in contrast to embryonic stages, may require specific trans-activators. (Maurange,Cédric and Renato Paro. Cellular memory module conveys epigenetic inheritance of hedgehog expression during Drosophila wing imaginal disc development. 2002. Abstract.) (http://genesdev.cshlp.org/content/16/20/2672.abstract)

Our experiences, positive and negative, register a memory in cell tissue as well as in the energy field. Neuropepetides, the chemicals triggered by emotions, are thoughts converted into matter... your mind is in every cell of your body. (Myss, Caroline, PhD. Anatomy of the Spirit. CA: Three Rivers Press, 1997, p 35)

Studies of family ritual: Teens who ate a meal with an adult in their family an average of 5 days a week (versus 3) tended to smoke, drink, and abuse drugs less, and be more optimistic and motivated in school. There maybe a subtle love energy at work in the form of cardio-energetic parenting.Families share cellular memories in every ritual. (Lipton, Bruce, PhD. The Biology of Belief. CA: Mountain of Love / Elite Books, 2005, pp 163-164)

In recent years, molecular biology has shown that the genome is far more fluid and responsive to the environment than previously supposed. It has also shown that information can be transmitted to descendants in ways other than through the base sequence of DNA. (Lipton, Bruce, PhD. The Biology of Belief. p 72. CA: Mountain of Love / Elite Books, 2005.)

Some primitive memory is stored at the sensory level beginning during late gestation. They are cellular memories because they are unconscious, preverbal, and are often held and expressed in specific parts of the body. (Karr-Morse, Robin, and Meredith S. Wiley. Ghosts from the Nursery. NY: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1997, p 42)

Heredity can involve much more than genes and chromosomes. Molecules clinging to DNA can produce striking differences between two organisms with the same genes. And those molecules can be inherited along with DNA.” (Zimmer, Carl. NYT Science. November 2008.) (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/11/science/11gene.html?_r=2&oref=slogin)

When people hold hands they exchange “L” energy and create cellular memories. This is stronger when two people are walking and holding right hand to left than when holding right-to-right as in shaking hands. (Lipton, Bruce, PhD. The Biology of Belief. CA: Mountain of Love / Elite Books, 2005, pp 163-164)

Single cells learn through environmental experiences, create cellular memories, and pass them on to their offspring. (Lipton, Bruce, PhD. The Biology of Belief. CA: Mountain of Love / Elite Books, 2005, p 38)

Diane Ackerman: you carry a permanent cellular memory of your mother’s heart beat. (Pearsall, Paul, PhD. The Heart’s Code. NY: Broadway Books, 1998, pp 66-67)

All memory is encoded at the cellular level. (McClaskey, Thomas R. D.C., C.H.T., B.C.E.T.S Decoding Traumatic Memory Patterns at the Cellular Level. 1998.) (http://www.aaets.org/arts/art30.htm)

Single cells are capable of learning through environmental experiences. They are able to create cellular memories, which they pass on to their offspring. This means that genes are not set in concrete at birth. Environmental influences (e.g., stress, nutrition, emotions) can modify the genes without changing their basic blueprint. Those modifications can be passed on to future generations. (Lipton, Bruce, PhD. The Biology of Belief. P. 38-67. CA: Mountain of Love/Elite Books, 2005)

At the heart of this new field of epigenetics is a simple but contentious idea — that genes have a 'memory.' That the lives of your grandparents — the air they breathed, the food they ate, even the things they saw — can directly affect you, decades later, despite your never experiencing these things yourself. (BBC, Ghost In Your Genes.) (http://works.bepress.com/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1001&context=gary_marchant)

Every experience in life is recorded in the body’s nervous system, especially recollections of fearful times. (Schaeffer, Brenda. Is It Love Or Is It Addiction? CA: Harper & Row, 1987, p 22)

Molecular interactions, such as enzymes and neuropeptides,are involved in cellular memory. There is a subtle energy involved in the way these substances do their work (Bohm). Every body event, whether the workings of enzymes, neuropeptides, hormones, blood, or skin, is an info-energetic event. (Pearsall, Paul, PhD. The Heart’s Code. NY: Broadway Books, 1998, p 52)

Study by Schwartz and Russek (1997-1998): the recipient’s rejection process of a transplanted organ may reflect not only rejection of the material organ (the cellular component) but also rejection of the donated cellular memory (the information and energy stored within the transplanted donor cells). (D'Alberto, Attilio, BSc (Hons). Cellular Memory and ZangFu Theory. Article.)

Many studies going back to the 1950s have found that parental levels of education or income affect their children’s brains. Now a new study at Boston Children’s Hospital, published in the journal Developmental Science, has found that how a mother perceives herself in comparison to other mothers may also impact her child’s brain development. Specifically, the mother’s perceived level of social status consistently predicted levels of two things in the children’s brains: the stress hormone cortisol and activation in some of the brain’s memory areas. Margaret Sheridan PhD of the Labs of Cognitive Neuroscience and the study’s first author said: "Our results indicate that a mother's perception of her social status 'lives' biologically in her children." (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130809115100.htm)

Problems in a condition such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, are an expression of traumatically encoded information at the cellular level. All of the information associated with the trauma is encoded at the cellular level. Through therapist if the cellular memory is connected with normal cognitive function the traumatic memory may be able to be therapeutically reframed. (McClaskey, D.C., C.H.T.,B.C.E.T.S., Thomas R. Decoding Traumatic Memory Patterns at the Cellular Level. American Academy of Experts in Traumatic Stress. 2006.) (http://www.aaets.org/article30.htm)

Cellular memory, while not conscious (e.g., I had corn-on-the-cob for lunch), is powerful. It influences the flow of information substances throughout the brain and body. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. (Audio cassettes).NY: Sound Ideas, 1997)

There is mounting evidence for a theory of cellular memory that extends back into the prenatal period. Specific parts of the body seem able to hold and express these memory patterns behaviorally (rather than verbally). (Karr-Morse, Robin, and Meredith S. Wiley. Ghosts from the Nursery. NY: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1997, p 83)

Strong emotional stimuli release hormones and neurotransmitters that help to embed that emotional memory in your neural circuitry. You tend to remember things in relation to how important they are to you and are more likely to recall strong negative emotional states than positive ones. (Childre, Doc and Howard Martin. The HeartMath Solution. CA: Harper SF, 1999, pp 202-203)

Exercise: mentally focus on your heart. It can help you regulate your emotions. Picture taking disturbed feelings into the heart and soaking them there. This won’t necessarily make the issue disappear, but it can take the density out of your cellular memory and reduce its power. (Childre, Doc and Howard Martin. The HeartMath Solution. CA: Harper SF, 1999, pp 193-194)

Some primitive memory is stored at the sensory level beginning during late gestation. They are cellular memories because they are unconscious, preverbal, and are often held and expressed in specific parts of the body. (Karr-Morse, Robin, and Meredith S. Wiley. Ghosts from the Nursery. NY: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1997, p 42)

Orgasm represents a cardio-energetic power surge. Large amounts of “L” energy are exchanged between partners and the heart rate more than doubles. If body fluids are exchanged as well, even more info-energy may be transmitted with the exchanged cells’ memory. (Lipton, Bruce, PhD. The Biology of Belief. CA: Mountain of Love / Elite Books, 2005, pp 179-180)

There is also the possibility that epigenetic inheritance is implicated in the passing down of certain cultural, personality or even psychiatric traits. For instance, historical "insults," such as Oliver Cromwell's brutal reconquest of Ireland in 1649, have led to an "embedding" of attitudes within the affected communities that persist for generations. Could it be that historical traumas, such as transatlantic slavery, leave some kind of genetic mark on the descendants of their victims? (Hunter, Phillip. What Genes Remember.) (http://philoscience.unibe.ch/documents/TexteHS09/genes_remember.pdf)

Jasienska (2009) argues that epigenetic effects of slavery in the 18th and the 19th century partly explain the lower average birth weight among African- Americans in the US. (Lundborg, Petter and Anders Stenberg. Nature, nurture and socioeconomic policy—What can we learn from molecular genetics?) (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B73DX-50V5NKX-1&_user=10&_coverDate=08/22/2010

All thoughts first enter your system as energy. Each conscious thought (and many unconscious ones) generate a physiological response. Those that carry emotional, mental, psychological, or spiritual energy produce biological responses that are then stored in your cellular memory. Your biography is woven into your biological system. According to energy medicine, human beings are all living history books. (Myss, Caroline, PhD. Anatomy of the Spirit. CA: Three Rivers Press, 1997. All.)

Humans have recognized that traits of the parents are often seen in offspring. This insight led to the practical application of selective breeding of plants and animals, eventually leading to domestication, but did not address the central question of inheritance: how are these traits conserved between generations, and what causes variation? Cellular mechanisms may allow for co-transmission of some epigenetic marks. Emerging studies are finding patterns of epigenetic conservation across generations. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transgenerational_epigenetics)

Memories have been instilled in all your cells. If you receive someone else’s cells, (e.g., organ transplant) you receive the memories encoded in those cells, too. (Chopra, Deepak, MD. Ageless Body, Timeless Mind. NY: Harmony Books, 1993, pp 22-25)

A 7-year old child has nightmares about being killed after receiving the heart of a child who was murdered. A lawyer from Milwaukee began craving Snickers after he received the heart of a 14-year-old boy who loved Snickers. (Health. Shocking Examples of Cellular Memory. 2006.) (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-381587/Shocking-examples-cellular-memory.html)

Half of a cell’s nucleus is DNA, the other half involves regulatory proteins that form a type of “sleeve” over the DNA. These protein scan be modified by the environment. Epigenetic “dials” can create more than2,000 variations of proteins from the same gene blueprint, which can alter the gene’s impact. (Lipton, Bruce, PhD. The Biology of Belief. CA: Mountain of Love / Elite Books, 2005, pp 67-70)

Subtle effects on some transplant recipient’s consciousness and personality is thought to be due to the infor-energetic cellular memories that come with the transplanted heart. (Pearsall, Paul, PhD. The Heart’s Code. NY: Random House,Inc., 1998, pp 72-73)

The Fifth Force or “L” energetic intelligence, nonlocal and invisible, may be involved when donated cells seem to “remember” where they came from. (Pearsall, Paul, PhD. The Heart’s Code. NY: Broadway Books, 1998, pp l40-44)

Every cell has a “mind.” Tissue cells moved from one body to another carry memories with them that can impact the second body (e.g., kidney transplant patients often report new food preferences). (Sylvia, Claire, with William Novak. A Change of Heart. NY: Little, Brown and Company, 1997, pp 211-221)

A heart transplant recipient’s surprisingly accurate dreams about her donor, alteration in food tastes, and many other changes offer clues about the possibilities of cellular memories. (Pearsall, Paul, PhD. The Heart’s Code. NY: Broadway Books,1998, p 11)

Transplant recipients (e.g., heart, liver, kidney) can begin to participate in cellular memories from the donor, released when the tissues were placed inside another body. (Chopra, Deepak,MD. Ageless Body, Timeless Mind. NY: Harmony Books, 1993, pp 22-24)

The accuracy of memories that often accompany transplants is beyond coincidence or chance. (Lipton,Bruce, PhD. The Biology of Belief. CA: Mountain of Love / Elite Books, 2005, pp 190-192)

Study by Schwartz and Russek (1997, 1998a, 1998b): There is evidence that the recipient's rejection process of a transplanted organ, may reflect not only rejection of the material organ (the cellular component), but also rejection of the donated cellular memory (the information and energy stored within the transplanted donor cells). (D' Alberto, Attilio. Cellular Memory and ZangFu Theory.) http://med-vetacupuncture.org/english/articles/attilio/cellmem1.html

A heart transplant recipient’s surprisingly accurate dreams about her donor, alteration in food tastes, and many other changes offer clues about the possibilities of cellular memories. (Pearsall, Paul, PhD. The Heart’s Code. NY: Broadway Books, 1998, p 11)

Old traumas stored in the body as cellular memory may be sensed as a color, or look like shapes or images especially if the trauma was experienced prior to the development of language. Cellular memories may also be generated vicariously (e.g., observing abuse of others). (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion (audio cassettes) NY: Sound Ideas, 1997)

The pain of the woman’s childhood is imprinted on her cells. Until and unless she deals with her past, her feelings will tend to be out of proportion to the events that trigger them. (Roth, Geneen. When Food is Love. NY: Penguin Group, 1991, 1992, p 157)

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