Female brain is organized to respond more sensitively to all sensory stimuli. (Moir, Anne, and David Jessel. Brain Sex. p 17. NY: Carol Publishing Group, 1989, 1991.)

Women have more finely tuned sensory skills than men. Women have superior sensitivity in differentiating tone changes in voice volume and pitch, and at differentiating sounds. Men are better at identifying where the sounds are coming from. (Pease, Barbara and Allan. Why Men Don’t Listen and Women Can’t Read Maps. p 31-32. NY: Broadway Books, 1998.)

Comparatively speaking, male senses are somewhat dulled. Females, with higher perceptiveness, expect males to anticipate their needs as another female would. (Pease, Barbara and Allan. Why Men Don’t Listen and Women Can’t Read Maps. p 38-39. NY: Broadway Books, 1998.)

On average, girls take in more sensory data, hear better, smell better, and take in more information through fingertips and skin than do boys. (Gurian, Michael, and Patricia Henley with Terry Trueman. Boys and Girls Learn Differently! p 26-29. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Company, 2001.)

Females react acutely and quickly to pain, although their overall resistance to long-term discomfort is stronger than in males. (Gurian, Michael, and Patricia Henley with Terry Trueman. Boys and Girls Learn Differently! p 27. CA: Jossey-Bass, 2001.)

The Thalamus regulates emotional life and physical safety; processes incoming sensory information; tells us what’s going on outside body. It processes data faster in females, especially at certain times in the menstrual cycle. (Gurian, Michael, and Patricia Henley with Terry Trueman. Boys and Girls Learn Differently! p 26. CA: Jossey-Bass, 2001.)

Comparatively speaking, male senses are somewhat dulled. Females, with higher perceptiveness, expect males to anticipate their needs as another female would. (Pease, Barbara and Allan. Why Men Don’t Listen and Women Can’t Read Maps. p 38-39. NY: Broadway Books, 1998.)

Women are more receptive on all five sensory channels. Illustrates using a car dealership as an example (e.g., vision, colors, hearing, touch, smell, notice, recall of details). (Barletta, Martha. Marketing to Women. p 154-155. IL: Dearborn Trade Publishing, 2003.)

Female brain processes both language and feelings at the same time far more efficiently than the male brain. The left hemisphere processes words, definitions, and language. The right hemisphere processes inflection, tonality, tempo, and volume of communication. (Jensen, Eric. Brain-Based Learning (Revised). p 16-19. CA: The Brain Store, 2005.)

Males tend to hear in one ear better than the other. Females hear as well with both ears and tend to hear more data. (Gurian, Michael. The Wonder of Boys. p 16-19. NY: Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam, 1996.)

Study at University of Sheffield and published in the journal Neurolmage: males processed female voices in the auditory part of the brain that processes music (rather than in Wernicke’s area as is used for processing male voices). The female voice is more difficult for males to listen to as compared to a male voice. (Source.)

On average, females have superior hearing and are better at hearing high sounds, beginning in girlhood and increasing with age. They are more sensitive to loud noises. (Fisher, Helen, PhD. The First Sex. p 85-87. NY:Random House, 1999.)

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