Your learning style or preference simply means the way your brain tends to learn best. Studies at the University of Western Ontario have shown that your learning style involves your preferred method of taking in, organizing, and making sense of information. This can be complicated by the fact that different situations and learning environments often require different learning strategies. And different teachers themselves have different learning (and therefore) different teaching styles. Three primary learning styles are: auditory (learning by hearing or reading), visual (learning by seeing), and kinesthetic (learning by doing). Researchers suggest that if you're looking to improve your effectiveness as a learner, identify the way your brain prefers to learn, and then develop a couple of additional strategies for learning in the other two learning styles. choose the learning preference category that you feel best matches the way you like to learn (e.g. visually), and check to see if you follow the suggested strategies (e.g. enhancing visual learning). Then, look at the strategies for the other two learning styles, and try to implement some of these ideas into your repertoire as well. (Source)

  • Auditory Learning Style

    Researchers at the University of Western Ontario have provided some tips for those who have an auditory learning style or who need to absorb information in that sensory system (hearing or reading) in a specific situation. When listening, sit towards the front of the room so you can hear well and avoid being distracted by sounds others make; repeat information silently to yourself as you take notes. When reading, repeat information either silently or aloud; use rhymes or jingles to remember key points; for terminology, think about how parts of the words sound ; consider studying with a partner, taking turns reading to each other and discussing key concepts. Some auditory learners like to record themselves verbalizing key points and then play the recording back as a rehearsal strategy. (Source)

  • Visual Learning Style

    Researchers at the University of Western Ontario have provided some tips for those who have a visual learning style or who need to absorb information in that sensory system (seeing) in a specific situation. In a lecture setting: sit where you can see the instructor and all visual aids; sit near the front to avoid potential distractions; watch for key words in PowerPoint slides or white boards to help organize notes; use symbols or colors in your notes to help draw attention to key concepts; review topic on a website, if available. If learning by text: minimize visual distractions; look for diagrams or charts or outline key topics in diagram format; consider rehearsing with flash cards; highlight information in color (using similar colors for topic or related information); connect important terminology to portions of a word you may already know. (Source)

  • Kinesthetic Learning Style

    Researchers at the University of Western Ontario have provided some tips for those who have a kinesthetic learning style or who need to absorb information in that sensory system (hands on) in a specific situation. In a class: take a small object (e.g., stress brain or ball) to class to squeeze with in one hand while the other takes notes; participate through questions and discussions whenever possible; stand up and stretch at every break or negotiate with the teacher to allow you to stand quietly at the side or back of room as needed; select classes with 1-hour segments (rather than 3-hour sections) whenever possible; connect relevance and applicability of the topic to life in general or to your life in particular in a practical way. (Source)

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