Sexual identity is in place at time of birth and relates to hormonal processes that template the brain near the end of the first trimester of pregnancy. Other factors (e.g., child rearing, societal conditioning) likely do little except reinforce or disturb one’s core sexual identity. (Seligman, Martin E P., PhD. What You Can Change...and What You Can’t. p 148-173. NY:Fawcett Books, 1993.)

For most people, heterosexual impulses predominate, although all are bisexual to some degree. (Viorst, Judith. Necessary Losses. p 107-109. NY:Simon & Schuster, 1986.)

Provides a table and description of things that can be changed and those that can’t (e.g., Sexual identity is unchangeable, Sexual Orientation is probably unchangeable). (Seligman, Martin E P., PhD. What You Can Change...and What You Can’t. p 244-260. NY:Fawcett Books, 1993.)

Males and females could live more happily if they acknowledged their differences and built lives on twin pillars of distinct sexual identities. (Moir, Anne, and David Jessel. Brain Sex. p 8. NY: Carol Publishing Group, 1989, 1991.)

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