All over the world on all continents and in all cultures, brain differences exist between female brains and male brains. (Gurian, Michael, PhD, with Barbara Annis. Leadership and the Sexes. p xx. CA: Jossey-Bass, 2008.)

Female brain can multitrack (dealing with a number of pieces of information at one time) and can talk during sex. Male brain is organized for monotracking (e.g., focusing on one piece of information at a time), and must switch to their left hemisphere in order to talk during sex, which may cause them to lose their erection. (Pease, Barbara and Allan. Why Men Don’t Have a Clue and Women Always Need More Shoes. p 8-10, 214-215, 261-262. NY:Broadway Books, 2004.)

The brain areas of males and females related to sex differ. Genes create the basic template, primarily during gestation, that is acted upon by hormones. (Carter, Rita, Ed. Mapping the Mind. p 73. CA: University of California Press, 1998.)

For males, sex traditionally has been the primary proving ground for masculinity. For females, sex becomes something she can barter for “love.” In general, societal conditioning makes men and women a mismatch in bed. This polarization can actually influence them to become sexual enemies. (Goldberg, Herb, PhD. The New Male-Female Relationship. p 68-71. p 68-70. NY:Signet Books, 1983.)

Quality versus Quantity: Females have a higher threshold of sexual excitability, are more easily distracted during intercourse, and are often more deeply interested in sex as a human relationship. Males are more superficially interested in sex and tend to make up in quantitative activity what they fail to experience qualitatively. (Montague, Ashley. The Natural Superiority of Women. p 97-99. NY: Collier Books, a division of Macmillan Publishing Co., Inc., 1952, 1974.)

Generally a man knows when he is open to having sex. If he’s open to it he usually wants it. A woman may be open to having sex but may need more time to decide if she really wants it. (Gray, John, PhD. Men, Women, and Relationships. p 91-92. OR: Beyond Words Publishing, Inc., 1990-1993.)

Males are totally focused and undistracted during sex. Females are still acutely aware of environmental sounds or changes. (Pease, Barbara and Allan. Why Men Don’t Listen and Women Can’t Read Maps. p 214-215. NY:Broadway Books, 1998.)

Mismatches can be based on conditioning. Conquest-Intimacy (e.g., females perceive sex in the context of love and intimacy; males in the context of challenge and lust). Mismatches can include Sensuality-Sexuality, Emotional-Intellectual, Goal versus Process, Actor-Reactor, and Animal-Madonna. (Goldberg, Herb, PhD. The New Male-Female Relationship. p 71-78. NY: Signet Books, 1983.)

The average woman has fewer sexual partners during her lifetime than the average man. Men are slightly more sexually active at every age. (Nicholson, John. Men and Woman: How Different are They? p 140-141. NY: Oxford University Press, 1984.)

Male sexual performance at age 19 is more compatible with a female in her late 30s or early 40s. (Pease, Barbara and Allan. Why Men Don’t Listen and Women Can’t Read Maps. p 191-200. NY: Broadway Books, 1998.)

Sex Object or Success Object? To bolster his masculinity, males may treat their female partners as sex objects. Conversely, females may treat their male partners as a success object, perhaps to compensate for her fear of independence, aggression, and the direct expression of power. (Goldberg, Herb, PhD. The New Male-Female Relationship. p 38-39. NY: Signet Books, 1983.)

In sexual responsiveness, males are more readily aroused and more easily satisfied than women. The sexual response cycle of women runs at a slower rate than that of men. Average male and female arousal patterns are poorly synchronized. In fact, many females can be somewhat indifferent to sex for long periods of their life. (Wilson, Glenn. The Great Sex Divide. p 88-93. England: Peter Owen Publishers, 1989

Sex Object or Success Object? To bolster his masculinity, males may treat their female partners as sex objects. Conversely, females may treat their male partners as a success object, perhaps to compensate for her fear of independence, aggression, and the direct expression of power. (Goldberg, Herb, PhD. The New Male-Female Relationship. p 38-39. NY:Signet Books, 1983.)

The female brain is less arousable than the male brain and responds differently to visual/auditory arousal stimuli. Study: levels were higher in males than females after viewing an erotic film. Influenced by testosterone, norephinephrine tends to rise with hyperactivity, euphoria, self-assertion, and aggressiveness. (Durden-Smith, Jo, and Diane deSimone. Sex and the Brain. p 243-254. NY:Arbor House Publishing, 1983.)