Sexual identity is in place at time of birth and relates to hormonal processes that template the brain near the end of the first trimester of pregnancy. Other factors (e.g., child rearing, societal conditioning) likely do little except reinforce or disturb one’s core sexual identity. (Seligman, Martin E P., PhD. What You Can Change…and What You Can’t. p 148-173. NY: Fawcett Books, 1993.)

Sexual orientation (heterosexual or homosexual) is a close cousin to sexual identity in both depth of layer and inflexibility. (Seligman, Martin E P., PhD. What You Can Change…and What You Can’t. p 148-173. NY: Fawcett Books, 1993.)

For most people, heterosexual impulses predominate, although all are bisexual to some degree. (Viorst, Judith. Necessary Losses. p 107-109. NY: Simon & Schuster, 1986.)

Some things can be changed and some can’t (e.g., Sexual identity is unchangeable, Sexual Orientation is likely unchangeable as well). (Seligman, Martin E P., PhD. What You Can Change…and What You Can’t. p 244-260. NY: Fawcett Books, 1993.)

For most people, heterosexual impulses predominate, although all are bisexual to some degree. (Viorst, Judith. Necessary Losses. p 107-109. NY: Simon & Schuster, 1986.)

There are exclusive homosexuals and optional (bisexual) homosexuals. Compares exclusive homosexuality in males with Androgen-Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS) and MF transsexuality. (Seligman, Martin E P., PhD. What You Can Change…and What You Can’t. p 148-173. NY: Fawcett Books, 1993.)

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