There is an endocrine basis for homosexual preference if fetal development is interrupted and mother’s androgens are interfered with at the time of sexual differentiation in the brain. (Joy, Donald, PhD. The Innate Differences Between Males & Females (Audio Cassette). CO: Focus on the Family, 1967.)

Contributors to the development of homosexuality may include: Direct alteration of hormones during fetal development, use of drugs that impact androgens (e.g., Depo-Provera, diazepam, marijuana), maternal severe emotional stress (stress hormones may cross the placenta and interfere with testosterone production in the baby), immune reaction against chemicals necessary for sexual differentiation. (Wilson, Glenn. The Great Sex Divide. p 78-80. England: Peter Owen Publishers, 1989.)

The brain areas of males and females related to sex differ. Genes create the basic template, primarily during gestation, that is acted upon by hormones. (Carter, Rita, Ed. Mapping the Mind. p 73. CA: University of California Press, 1998.)

“Nobody in science now believes that sexual orientation is caused by events in adolescence ... Homosexuality is an early, probably prenatal, and irreversible preference.”  ―Author and Geneticist Matt Ridley. Summary of 14 studies that show brain and body differences between heterosexual and homosexual individuals (e.g., inner ear, finger lengths, finger ridges, startle reflex, maternal side, etc.). Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance. Religious Tolerance.org    http://www.religioustolerance.org/hom_caus4.htm

Sex hormones create masculinization over time, so males can be more or less masculine. Females can be masculinized but not defeminized. (Durden-Smith, Jo, and Diane deSimone. Sex and the Brain. p 104-117. NY: Arbor House Publishing, 1983.)

Variations in androgens (male sex hormones) and estrogens (female sex hormones) can affect both body asymmetry and the degree/direction of gender differentiation in the brain. (Howard, Pierce J., PhD. The Owner’s Manual for the Brain. p 215-221. GA: Bard Press, 1994, 2000.)

Sex hormones create masculinization over time, so males can be more or less masculine. Females can be masculinized but not defeminized. (Durden-Smith, Jo, and Diane deSimone. Sex and the Brain. p 104-117. NY: Arbor House Publishing, 1983.)

For some lesbians, their hormone balance was probably more like that of males during fetal development (e.g., some lesbian women have unusually high testosterone levels). (Wilson, Glenn. The Great Sex Divide. p 75-76. England: Peter Owen Publishers, 1989.)

Lesbians tend to exhibit attributes associated with exposure to higher testosterone levels while in the womb. (Pease, Barbara and Allan. Why Men Don’t Listen and Women Can’t Read Maps. p 165-168. NY: Broadway Books, 1998.)

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