>

Music, a prelinguistic language, contains the main characteristics of speech (e.g., tonal pitch, timbre, intensity and rhythm). Music can help to prepare a child to listen to, integrate, and produce language sounds. (Tomatis, Alfred A, M.D., Edited by Timothy M. Gilmore, PhD, et al. About the Tomatis Method. p 70-80. Canada: The Listening Centre Press, 1989.)

The primarily difference between speech and music involves the velocity of frequency changes in milliseconds. Velocity in music is slower than in speech. (Harris, Maureen. Music and the Young Mind. p 1-2. NY: MENC with Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2009.)

Studies by Flohr, Persellin, and Miller (1996 and 1993) concluded that young children exposed to music or receive music instruction had the ability to detect pitch variations in both music and language better than those children who had not learned music. Children who are not exposed to music at a young age are deprived (Edwin Gordon, 2003) of the optimal time for learning and development. (Harris, Maureen. Music and the Young Mind. p 1-2. NY: MENC with Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2009.)

Both music and language are found in multiple areas of the brain. They cause the brain to coordinate in several different regions, whether you are creating with language or music or just listening. This makes it possible to lose function in some parts of the brain and yet hand onto key aspects of language and music in others. (Lynch, Zack, PhD, with Byron Laursen. The Neuro Revolution. How Brain Science is Changing Our World, p. 124-125. NY: St. Martin’s Press, 2009.)

enfrdeitptrues
Share this page via
Go to top
JSN Boot template designed by JoomlaShine.com