No two brains are exactly the same. (Restak, Richard, MD. Mozart’s Brain and the Fighter Pilot. p 89-90. NY: Harmony Books, 2001.)

No two human brains are alike. (Healy, Jane M., PhD. Your Child’s Growing Mind. p 4-5. NY: Doubleday, 1987, 1989.)

Brains are like fingerprints. Each brain possesses a unique neurological topography. (Johnson, Steven. Mind Wide Open. p 4. NY: Scribner, 2004.)

Every human brain is as unique as a fingerprint; no two are exactly alike. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that no two brains function identically. (Williams, Linda.Teaching for the Two-Sided Mind. p 25. CA: Touchstone Books: 1986.)

The particular configuration of bumps and fissures along the cortical surface of any
individual brain is as unique as the pattern of loops and whorls in a fingerprint. (Miller, Lawrence, PhD. Inner Natures. Brain, Self & Personality. p 27. NY: Ballantine Books, 1990.)

Like fingerprints, each human brain is different. (Herrmann, Ned. The Creative Brain. p 22. NC: Ned Herrmann Group, 1993.)

Your brain possesses a unique neurological topography. Brains are like fingerprints. (Johnson, Steven. Mind Wide Open. p 4. NY: Scribner, 2004.)

Synaptic connections evolve or originate as a consequence of an individual’s experiences and continue evolving throughout the person’s life. The term Experience-Dependent Brain Development refers to the way in which unique or individual experiences contribute to brain growth and refine existing brain structures. Neuronal synapses are uniquely affected by life experiences. Differences among the brain of individuals (e.g., poets, mechanics, and mathematicians) can be attributed to each person’s habitual exercise of differing regions in the brain. (Schramm, Derek D., PhD.The Creative Brain. p 2, 7-8. CA: Institute for Natural Resources, Health Update. 2007.)

People differ with respect to the structure and organization of their brains, which includes variability in the encoding of individual abilities. There is no one “best” personality-type. (Miller, Lawrence, PhD. Inner Natures. p 32-33. NY: Ballantine Books, 1990.)

Each brain’s developmental pattern is unique so no two brains are alike. Even the brains of identical twins are not exactly the same. (Restak, Richard, MD. The New Brain. p 3, 191-192. PA: Rodale, 2003.)

The brain of each human being on planet earth is unique. (Levine, Mel, MD. A Mind at a Time. p 13-14, 60-62. NY:Simon & Schuster, 2002.)

Although people’s brains don’t look much different from each other, they are as different as their faces. No two brains on the planet are exactly alike. Each brain is different. (Brynie, Faith Hickman. 101 questions your brain has asked about itself but couldn’t answer until now. p 15. CT:Millbrook Press, 1998.)

Individual differences in brain structure will be the norm rather than the exception, even in identical twins. (Byrnes, James, p. Minds, Brains, and Learning. p 44. NY: The Gulford Press, 2001.)

There are about 6 billion belief systems in the world (since each human brain is unique). (Newberg, Andrew, MD., and Mark Robert Waldman. Why We Believe What We Believe. p 25. NY: Free Press, 2006.)

No two human brains are exactly alike. (Healy, Jane M., PhD. Your Child’s Growing Mind.p 4. NY:Doubleday, 1987.)

Each brain contains approximately the same number of neurons in each brain system. The particular way those neurons are connected is distinct, however. That uniqueness makes us who we are. (LeDoux, Joseph. Synaptic Self. p 300-304. NY:Penguin Books, 2002.)

All brains look very much the same to the naked eye. (Greenfield, Susan, Con. Ed. Brain Power, Working out the Human Mind. p 105. NY:Ivy Press Limited, 1999.)

Each mind has its specialties and frailties. No one can be good at everything. However, society / school expects children to shine in all classes, athletics, and in following verbal directions. (Levine, Mel, MD. A Mind at a Time. p 60-62. NY:Simon & Schuster, 2002.)

All of our brains have the same general features that make us human, but each neural connection is unique, reflecting a person’s special genetic endowment and life experience. Circuit connections are made stronger or weaker throughout a lifetime according to use. (Ratey, John J., MD. A User’s Guide to the Brain. p 30-31. NY: Vintage Books, 2002.)

Every time one individual duplicates another, the world has lost a person. In the process they lose their own identity and their unique contribution to the world. (Conway, Jim and Sally. Women In Midlife Crisis. p 99-100. IL:Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., 1971.)

Synaptic connections evolve or originate as a consequence of an individual’s experiences and continue evolving throughout the person’s life. The term Experience-Dependent Brain Development refers to the way in which unique or individual experiences contribute to brain growth and refine existing brain structures. Neuronal synapses are uniquely affected by life experiences. Differences among the brain of individuals (e.g., poets, mechanics, and mathematicians) can be attributed to each person’s habitual exercise of differing regions in the brain. (Schramm, Derek D., PhD.The Creative Brain. p 2, 7-8. CA:Institute for Natural Resources, Health Update. 2007.)

People differ with respect to the structure and organization of their brains, which includes variability in the encoding of individual abilities. There is no one “best” personality-type. (Miller, Lawrence, PhD. Inner Natures. p 32-33. NY:Ballantine Books, 1990.)

Each person’s brain is unique and operates most efficiently when involved in activities it does best. (Restak, Richard, MD. Mozart’s Brain and the Fighter Pilot. p 214-216. NY:Harmony Books, 2001.)

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