Studies: In males heavy usage can cause a reduction in sperm count, a reduction of well-shaped sperm, breast enlargement, and (in prepubescent or pubescent boys) interference with the development of the reproductive glands. In females heavy usage can cause disruption in the menstrual cycle and cessation of ovulation and menses. (Stump, Jane Barr, PhD. What’s the Difference? p 124. NY: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1985.)

The age at which a brain is exposed to marijuana may result in different effects to the brain’s white matter. Typically, marijuana use begins during adolescence and early adulthood. This is a particularly dangerous age because the brain is still developing and cannabis receptors are still abundant in white matter pathways. Researchers at Oxford University found impaired axonal pathways in the hippocampus and portions of the bridges (e.g., corpus callosum, commissure) that connect the two hemispheres in the brain of regular cannabis users. The amount of impairment to these brain areas was directly associated with the age at which the individual began regular use of marijuana. Study results suggest that long-term cannabis use is hazardous particularly to white matter in the developing brain of adolescents and young adults. Delaying the age at which regular use begins may minimize the severity of microstructural impairment. White matter alteration has been linked with several health concerns including cognitive impairment; vulnerability to psychosis, depression, and anxiety disorders; and clinical outcomes in schizophrenia. (http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/766633?src=journalnl)

When marijuana is used THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) binds to cannabinoid receptors in the brain/body and overstimulates them (e.g., can impair the receptors, can produce permanent adverse effects, contributes to addiction) producing marijuana intoxication. (Research Report, Marijuana Abuse. National Institute on Drug Abuse, US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health.)

Like a sedative, marijuana has the ability to relieve anxiety (e.g., triggers an initial increase in dopamine, wipes out the brain’s ability to concentrate). Cannabinoid receptors found in many areas of the brain (e.g., cortex, hippocampus) are activated by THC (tetrahydrocannabinol in marijuana. Long-term use affects brain efficiency (e.g., rats who are given THC have difficulty navigating mazes for up to several months after their last dose). (Guiffre, Kenneth, MD, with Theresa Foy DiGeronimo. The Care and Feeding of Your Brain. p 33-39. NJ: Career Press, 1999.)

Study: Individuals who regularly use marijuana showed reduced blood flow to the posterior cerebellum, associated with memory, language, and a sense of time. Long-term use had a noticeable effect on memory and brain function. (Greenwood-Robinson, Maggie, PhD. 20/20 Thinking. p 223. NY:Avery, Putnam Special Markets, 2003.)

Marijuana’s mind-altering effects (that can be addictive) are caused by THC, tetrahydrocannabinol, also the psychoactive ingredient in hashish. Affects to cardiovascular system (e.g., increased heart rate, enlarged blood vessels in the eyes). Affects to brain (e.g., euphoria, changes in perception of colors and sounds, posture imbalance, toxic psychosis including hallucinations, delusions, a loss of the sense of personal identity). The risk of toxic effects are increased when a strong dose of THC is consumed in food or drink rather than smoked. (New Research Report presents Marijuana facts. National Institute on Drug Abuse. NIDA NOTES, Volume 17, Number 3, p 15. http://www.drugabuse.gov/)

Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the USA. More than 83 million Americans (37%) age 12 and older have tried marijuana at least once, according to the 2001 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA). (Research Report, Marijuana Abuse. National Institute on Drug Abuse, US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health.

National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI)

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) (https://www.drugabuse.gov/)

When smoked, THC in marijuana moves rapidly from the lungs into the bloodstream. When it reaches the brain, THC connects to cannabinoid receptors on nerve cells. Higher numbers of cannabinoid receptors are found in portions of the brain related to pleasure, memory, thought, concentration, sensory and time perception, and coordinated movement. (Refer to Cannabinoids.) (Research Report, Marijuana Abuse. National Institute on Drug Abuse, US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health.)

National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI)

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) (https://www.drugabuse.gov/)

Marijuana’s begins to affect the brain immediately after the drug enters it. Effects last from 1-3 hours. If consumed in food or drink, the short-term effects begin more slowly (usually in 30 minutes to 1 hour) and last for as long as 4 hours. (Research Report, Marijuana Abuse. National Institute on Drug Abuse, US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health.)

National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI)

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) (https://www.drugabuse.gov/)

THC, tetrahydrocannabinol, is the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana and hashish. THC can trigger a perception of increased intensity of sensations, colors and sounds. (New Research Report presents Marijuana facts. National Institute on Drug Abuse. NIDA NOTES, Volume 17, Number 3, p 15. http://www.drugabuse.gov/)

enfrdeitptrues
Share this page via
Go to top
JSN Boot template designed by JoomlaShine.com