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Consumption of fruits and vegetables that contain carotenoids (e.g., green, dark yellow) has been linked to decreased risk of stroke, both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke. Each increment of three daily servings of fruits and vegetables equated to a 22% decrease in risk of stroke, including transient ischemic attack. (Gillman et al. Journal of the American Medical Association. Vol 273, 1995, p 1113)

People in the highest quintile for consumption of spinach or collard greens, plants high in the carotenoid lutein, had a 46% decrease in risk of age-related macular degeneration compared with those in the lowest quintile who consumed these vegetables less than once per month. (Seddon et al. Journal of the American Medical Association. Vol 272, 1994, p 1413)

Consumption of tomato products has been linked to decreased risk of prostate cancer. Men in the highest quintile for consumption of tomato products (10 or more servings a week) had about a 35% decrease in risk of prostate cancer compared with their counterparts whose consumption put them in the lowest quintile (1.5 or fewer servings of tomato products a week). (Giovannucci et al. Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Vol 87, 1995, p 1767)