The brain gathers information from all types of sources to make decisions, moment to moment. It gathers information, computes, makes a decision, and then you get the sensation of conscious experience. Consciousness takes time--it arrives after the work is done.(Gazzaniga, Michael S. Who's in Charge? p 127. NY: HarperCollins Publishers, 2011)

The conscious mind has the power to control many so-called involuntary actions. For example, “wet dreams” have rarely been observed in a dream lab. Using biofeedback techniques laboratory subjects have learned how to consciously alter actions (e.g., lower blood pressure, control amount of acid secreted in the stomach, regulate body temperature, and increase frequency of alpha waves in their brains). They have even learned to regulate their dreams (even children can learn to do this). (Padus, Emrika, Exec. Edit. The Complete Guide to Your Emotions and Your Health. p.318-320. PA: Rodale Press, Inc, 1992)

What did you grow up learning about your “mind” and “consciousness?” Although there are still multiple definitions for the mind (versus the brain), studies are showing a different concept of “mind.” According to work by Lorimer, your mind appears to be a multi-component unit that is not only interacting with the physical environment through demonstrable means, but also has the capacity to communicate with the cosmic universe through non-physical pathways.This certainly is, as the title of his book puts it, a wider science of consciousness. (Lorimer D. Thinking Beyond the Brain: A Wider Science of Consciousness; 34-80. Edinburgh, UK: Floris Books, 2001)

The conscious mind can be defined as whatever you are aware of at a moment in time. “Unconscious” is everything else that’s outside of your awareness at a point in time. The unconscious mind is responsible for about 95% of your learning and skill. (Bandler, Richard, and John Grinder.Frogs into Princes. p 37-38. UT: Real People Press, 1979.)

Did you know the conscious mind has the power to control many so-called involuntary actions? Using biofeedback techniques laboratory subjects have learned how to consciously alter actions (e.g., lower blood pressure, control amount of acid secreted in the stomach, regulate body temperature, and increase frequency of alpha waves in their brains). They have even learned to regulate their dreams (even children can learn to do this). For another example, “wet dreams” have rarely been observed in a dream lab yet it's a natural and common occurrence for males (e.g., males ejaculate semen during a dream). The conclusion by some researchers is that some type of control is involved (e.g., the brain is "conscious" of being observed and actively prevents an otherwise involuntary action from taking place). (Padus, Emrika, Exec. Edit. The Complete Guide to Your Emotions and Your Health. p.318-320. PA: Rodale Press, Inc, 1992)

Consciousness does not constitute a single, generalized process. Rather it involves a multitude of widely distributed specialized systems and disunited processes. The products of these are integrated in a dynamic manner by the interpreter module. Conscious experience is assembled on the fly, as the brain responds to constantly changing inputs, calculates potential courses of action, and execute responses like a streetwise person. (Gazzaniga, Michael S. Who's in Charge? p 102. NY: HarperCollins Publishers, 2011)

Studies suggest that consciousness emerges from the brain and body acting together. A growing body of evidence suggests that the heart plays a particularly significant role in this process. Far more than a simple pump, the heart is now viewed as a highly complex, self-organizing information processing center. It has its own functional heart-brain that communicates with, and influences, the cranial brain via the nervous system, hormonal system, and other pathways. (Popper, K., and J. C. Eccles. (2000), "The Self-Conscious Mind and the Brain." In: The Self and Its Brain. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, London and New York: 355-376)

The physiochemical brain does enable the mind in some way we don’t understand. In so doing, it follows the physical laws of the universe just like other matter. (Gazzaniga, Michael S. Who’s In Charge? p 3. NY: HarperCollins Publishers, 2011)

Part of one's day is spent in a state of hyperconsciousness (e.g., logical, rational, decision-oriented, verbal mode) in which one foreces the mind to attend. At other times, one operates in an altered state of consciousness. THink of it as the "automatic pilot effect" (e.g., you are driving and many miles have gone by outside conscious awareness). Most of what one is capable of is determined by part of the mind of which you can never become aware: the unconscious mind. (Padus, Emrika, Exec. Edit. The Complete Guide to Your Emotions and Your Health. p.398-400. PA: Rodale Press, Inc, 1992)

Studies have shown that the brain may have difficulty (or may not do so at all) distinguiging between supraliminal (above the conscious threshold) and subliminal (below the conscious threshold. (Restak, Richard, MD. The Naked Brain. p 33-34. NY: Three Rivers Press, 2006.)

The outcomes of an inclination can be encoded in brain activity up to ten seconds before it enters awareness. The brain has acted before its person is conscious of it. Brain activity involved in the initiation of an action such as pushing a button, occurred about 500 milliseconds before the action. Brain activity increased as many as 300 milliseconds before the conscious intention to act was reported by the subject. (Gazzaniga, Michael S. Who's in Charge? p 128-129. NY: HarperCollins Publishers, 2011)

What is your definition of romance? It may need to be expanded! Romance is the part of you that keeps the wonder in your life, that sees your life in beautiful terms, that creates a transcendent moment in time, that (as with a prism) breaks trivialities into the brilliant colors of true meaning. Consciousness is the lifeblood of romance. Develop the art of paying attention. You can do that by looking on things from the perspective of a child’s eye. (Padus, Emrika, Exec. Edit. The Complete Guide to Your Emotions and Your Health. p.60-63. PA: Rodale Press, Inc, 1992)

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