Brain-Body Connection

Study: subliminal messages in ad campaigns have little effect on consumer behaviors. Everyday advertisements, however, may influence consumers without their being aware of it. (Wilson, Timothy D. Strangers to Ourselves. England: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2002, pp 185-187)

The most alpha waves are produced during in-between states, between consciousness and subconsciousness. (Markova, Dawna, PhD. The Open Mind. CA: Conari Press, 1996, pp 26-28)

Altered states of consciousness may result when both sympathetic and parasympathetic systems are triggered at the same time (e.g., by intense physical or mental activity, ceremonial rituals, or meditation). (Newberg, Andrew, MD, et al. Why God Won’t Go Away. NY: Ballantine Books, 2001, pp 38-40)

Compares amino acids to letters that form words (peptides). The amino acids form a language that directs every cell, organ, and system in the body. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

People with (amnesiac) disorders usually retain their level of intelligence and their general personalities. Although they can learn things nonconsciously, they typically are unable to recall any new experience. (Wilson, Timothy D. Strangers to Ourselves. England: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2002, pp 24-25)

Study: One 5-minute episode of recalled anger resulted in a short-term rise in IgA, followed by a severe depletion (e.g., required 6 hours to restore normal production); and suppressed the immune system for nearly a whole day. (Childre, Doc. Freeze Frame. CA: Planetary Publications, 1994, 1998, pp 41-43)

Generally human brains can realize some level of consciousness. No one knows to what extent non-humans (animals) possess consciousness. (LeDoux, Joseph. Synaptic Self. NY: Penguin Books, 2002, p 21)

Automatic thinking has five main features. It is nonconscious, fast, unintentional, uncontrollable, and effortless. Many have an “automatic” tendency to categorize and stereotype others. While the brain likely is designed to put people into categories, the content of stereotyping is learned. (Wilson, Timothy D. Strangers to Ourselves. England: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2002, pp 52-53)

Approximately 5% of what occurs in the subconscious comes to conscious awareness. Some behaviors further diminish conscious awareness (e.g., avoidance, denial, pretending, repression, lying). An increase in conscious awareness could potentially impact one’s health positively (e.g., you can only deal effectively with what you identify and label). (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion (audiocassettes). NY: Sound Ideas, 1997)

Organ recipients who experience changes based on cellular memory are usually those who are very aware of their bodies (e.g., creative people such as artists, poets and painters) and who are paying attention. (Sylvia, Claire, with William Novak. A Change of Heart. NY: Little, Brown and Company, 1997, pp 224-226)

T cells and B cells are each capable of recognizing and responding to a specific antigen. Cancerous cells often display unusual markers on cell surfaces that are rarely displayed on the surface of normal cells. (Tortora, Gerard J., and Sandra R. Grabowski. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology, 10th Edition. NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2003, pp 787-788)

Biofeedback, visualization, and certain forms of meditation can help to consciously trigger cellular processes that promote healing. It requires a conscious and deliberate interaction between your consciousness and your own body-mind. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

What the mind believes impacts the body’s biological functions. Once beliefs are in place, people rarely challenge their validity even in the face of contradictory evidence. (Newberg, Andrew, MD., and Mark Robert Waldman. Why We Believe What We Believe. NY: Free Press, 2006, pp 4-5)

When the brain produces mostly beta waves, we are more alert and least receptive. A state of consciousness. (Markova, Dawna, PhD. The Open Mind. CA: Conari Press, 1996, pp 23-24)

Johns Hopkins University scientist study: Growing fat cells and nerve cells in the same dish has produced what is believed to be the first demonstration of two-way communication between the cell types. The study, using rat and mouse cells, provides the first clear evidence that signals from fat cells can directly influence neurons outside of the brain. Researchers believe this has implications for understanding the storage and burning of fat, obesity, and related disorders, such as diabetes. (Source)

Neuropeptides link your biological clock to the motions of the planets. Quality of sleep and wakefulness is likely to improve when retiring and rising are matched to darkness and daylight. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 321)

Conscious birth memories are not retained (e.g., not recorded in language or retrievable in conscious thought). Somatic memories are retained in the limbic system and in the body. (Karr-Morse, Robin, and Meredith S. Wiley. Ghosts from the Nursery.NY: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1997, p 87)

Receptors on brain cells are replicated on immune cells. In this sense there’s really no distinction between the mind and the body. Created the term Bodymind. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, pp 28-29, 192)

Candace Pert PhD, discoverer of the endorphin receptor, coined the term bodymind to explain the unified collaboration between the brain and the body, immune system especially. (Howard, Pierce J., PhD. The Owner’s Manual for the Brain. GA: Bard Press, 1994, 2000, pp 28-29)

Studies: About 15%-20% of the blood flow leaving the heart goes to the brain, which requires a reliable fund of oxygen, glucose, and other nutrients. If this supply is cut off for only 8-10 seconds, unconsciousness results. If deprivation lasts over 30 seconds, permanent damage may occur. (Restack, Richard. Mysteries of the Mind. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic, 2000, p 11)

During instances of well being, communication between the central nervous system and immune system is well tuned and balanced. However, a disturbed crosstalk between the CNS and the immune system is thought to play a major role in a wide series of disorders characterized by a hyporesponsive or hyperresponsive immune system (e.g., MS). (Simone Kern and Tjalf Ziemssen. Brain–immune communication psychoneuroimmunology of multiple sclerosis. September 2007, Article)

Specific behaviors have been shown to alter the psychosomatic network and positively impact the brain/body communication. These behaviors include meditation, affirmation, and visualization. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

The brain and body are not separate entities. They impact each other profoundly and continually. (Carter, Rita, Ed. Exploring Consciousness. CA: University of California Press, 1998, p 8)

The brain and the body are not two separate things. They work in concert. (Guiffre, Kenneth, MD. The Care and Feeding of Your Brain. NJ: Career Press, 1999, p 12)

Human beings are designed to express thoughts and beliefs (brain) through symptoms that are exhibited physically (body). (Benson, Herbert, MD, with Marge Stark. Timeless Healing. NY: Scribner, 1996, pp 20-22)

Studies: Heart waves can be picked up by the brains of others. The heartbeat of one person can be measured as it is registered in the other person’s brainwaves when two people are touching/standing near each other. (Childre, Doc. Freeze Frame. CA: Planetary Publications, 1194, 1998, p 36)

Human beings were designed to function at optimum capacity when the heart and head are working in concert and highly attuned to each other. (Childre, Doc and Howard Martin. The HeartMath Solution. CA: Harper SF, 1999, p 40)

Exercise: mentally focus on your heart. It can help you regulate your emotions. Picture taking disturbed feelings into the heart and soaking them there. This won’t necessarily make the issue disappear, but it can take the density out of your cellular memory and reduce its power. (Childre, Doc and Howard Martin. The HeartMath Solution. CA: Harper SF, 1999, pp 193-194)

Refer to Cellular Memory for additional information.

Chakras are centers in the body that contain large numbers of neuropeptide receptors (e.g., solar plexus). Nourishing any one plexus enhances the effectiveness of the entire system. Trauma or neglect can block a system. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

The chakras (transmitters or transformers of energy) are believed to vibrate at a specific frequency as they distribute energy throughout the body. (Graham, Helen. Discover Color Therapy. CA: Ulysses Press, 1998, pp 18-26)

Every thought you think goes toward the composition of your body chemistry. (Fox, Arnold, MD, and Barry Fox, PhD. Wake Up! You’re Alive! FL: Health Communications, 1988, pp 30-32)

Symptoms can be observed in the body related to state of mind. Study: individuals were more likely to develop symptoms of illness after exposure to a cold virus (e.g., 15% higher) if they had experienced stressful life events during the prior 12 months. (Gilbert, Gary, MD. Is a Merry Heart like a Placebo? WA: Spectrum, Vol 26, No. 4, January 1998, pp 36-43)

Study: one 5-minute episode of mentally and emotionally experiencing the emotions of care and compassion caused a 34% average increase in IgA followed by a return to normal baseline. However, the IgA levels then gradually climbed above baseline throughout the next 6 hours. (Childre, Doc. Freeze Frame. CA: Planetary Publications, 1194, 1998, pp 41-43)

All of the information molecules known as peptides are distributed in intricate patterns all the way down both sides of the spine. These peptides and their receptors make the dialogue between conscious and unconscious processes possible. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, pp 188-189)

Consciousness seems to be a single mental system, not a collection of different modules. There may be cases in which consciousness can split into two or more independent systems, such as multiple personalities. (Wilson, Timothy D. Strangers to Ourselves. England: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2002, pp 49-50).

Studies: consciousness emerges from the activity of the cerebral cortex, especially from the frontal lobes (e.g., the prefrontal cortex or region just behind the bridge of the nose). It is involved with the generation of consciousness, the conscious perception of emotions, and the ability to attend and focus. (Carter, Rita, Ed. Mapping the Mind. CA: University of California Press, 1998, p 181)

Think of the mind as a library. The card catalogue is the conscious mind. It wants stability and usually goes for whatever is necessary (at least on the surface) to achieve this state. (Markova, Dawna, PhD. The Open Mind, Exploring the 6 Patterns of Natural Intelligence. CA: Conari Press, 1996, pp 24-28)

Consciousness is more than knowing and perceiving. It also involves the individual knowing that he/she knows. Neurons in the brain appear to be capable of giving the person this inner awareness. (Schwartz, Jeffrey M., MD, and Sharon Begley. The Mind & the Brain. NY Regan Books, 2002, pp 23-24)

We can have conscious access to the outcome of cognitive processes but are typically unaware of the processes that were involved in generating that content. (LeDoux, Joseph. Synaptic Self, How Our Brains. NY: Penguin Books, 2002, p 23)

Conscious processing accounts for only a small portion of the work done by the brain. The majority of the brain’s functions do not require consciousness. (Restak, Richard, MD. Mozart’s Brain and the Fighter Pilot. NY: Harmony Books, 2001, p 168)

The hippocampus encodes personal memories and (in the right hemisphere) assists with spatial memory.

  • Orbitofrontal Cortex: Emotions become conscious here; otherwise emotion is a robotic reflex without feeling.
  • Reticular Formation: Activity here stimulates the cortex into action without which there is no consciousness.
  • Temporal Lobe: Stores personal memories, processes sound and speech.

(Carter, Rita, Ed. Exploring Consciousness. CA: University of California Press, 1998, pp 29, 115.)

Cognition and consciousness are different. Describes consciousness as the product of cognitive processes. (LeDoux, Joseph. Synaptic Self. NY: Penguin Books, 2002, p 191)

fMRI study by neuroscientist and co-author John-Dylan Haynes of Max Planck Institute: researchers could predict people's decisions (e.g., using right or left hand to push a button) seven seconds before the test subjects were aware of making them. During those 7 seconds activity was evident in their frontopolar cortex and then in the parietal region. It seems that your consciousness is only aware of some of the things your brain is doing. (Keim, Brandon. Brain Scanners Can See Your Decisions Before You Make Them. Nature Neuroscience. April, 2008)

The digestive system is run by the molecules of emotion (e.g., endorphins, interferons). (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

For a physical symptoms to become manifest there must also be some emotional component present. The way the person thinks (mind-body connection) may minimize the dangers of getting sick and/or maximize recovery. (Friedman, Edwin H. Generation to Generation. NY: The Guilford Press, 1985, pp 124-130)

Refer to Downshifting and the Brain for additional information.

Strong emotions that are not processed thoroughly are stored at the cellular level. At night stored information is released into consciousness (dream). Re-experiencing the emotions through dreaming can be very healing (e.g., integrate the information for growth, take actions to forgive and let go). (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 290)

Because of massive complexity of information network pathways in the brain and body, when one drug is introduced into the body it is inevitably delivered by the blood to every part of the body and to every cell. (Lipton, Bruce H., PhD. The Biology of Belief. CA: Mountain of Love / Elite Books, 2005, pp 104-108)

Studies: Disturbances in a person’s mind can trigger disease and bodily dysfunction within the individual. (Dossey, Larry. MD. Healing Words. NY: HarperPaperbacks, 1993, pp 68-70)

Refer to Brain Dysfunctions for additional information.

The heart is a main electrical power center, generating 40-60 times more electrical power than the brain. The heart’s electrical signal affects every cell and can be measured at many points on the body. Two-way signals (heart and brain) regulate heart rate that can vary with each beat. (Childre, Doc. Freeze Frame. CA: Planetary Publications, 1194, 1998, pp 28-29)

Research studies have shown that the heart communicates information to the brain and throughout the body via electromagnetic field interactions. The heart generates the body’s most powerful and most extensive rhythmic electromagnetic field. The heart’s magnetic component is about 500 times stronger than the brain’s magnetic field and can be detected several feet away from the body. It was proposed that, this heart field acts as a carrier wave for information that provides a global synchronizing signal for the entire body. (McCraty, R., and M. Atkinson and R. T. Bradley. Electrophysiological Evidence of IntuitionPart 2; A System-Wide Process? Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (2004); 10(2):325-336)

Refer to Electromagnetic Energy for additional information.

Study: Yale epidemiologist, Lisa Berkman PhD. Positive emotional support alters levels of norepinephrine and cortisol in the brain. These chemicals are also believe to influence blood pressure and the heart’s response to stress. (Childre, Doc. Freeze Frame. CA: Planetary Publications, 1194, 1998, p 123)

Peptides are the sheet music containing the notes, phrases, and rhythms that allow the orchestra (your body) to play as an integrated entity. And the music that results is the tone or feeling that you experience subjectively as your emotions. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 148)

Emotions are a field of energy. They integrate all portions of the brain and body. They are the link between the physical and mental realms. They function in the brain and the body and between people. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

Emotions exist in the body as informational chemicals, the neuropeptides and receptors, and they also exist as feeling, inspiration, and love. Flowing freely they connect the physical and the nonphysical. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion.NY: Scribner, 1997, p 307)

Refer to Emotions and Feelings for more information.

Matter (M) is an expression of energy (E); cardio-energetics suggests that energy (E) is interchangeable with information (I). That matter, energy, and information may all be the same quantum substance (e.g., helps to explain the heart as a cellular mass and as an information energetic wave of particles). (Pearsall, Paul, PhD. The Heart’s Code. NY: Broadway Books, 1998, p 51)

The universe is an integration of interdependent energy fields. There is a massive complexity in the intercommunication among physical parts and energy fields that form the whole. The flow of information is holistic. (Lipton, Bruce H., PhD. The Biology of Belief. CA: Mountain of Love / Elite Books, 2005, pp 101-102)

Refer to Energy and the Brain for additional information.

Pert discovered the opiate receptor. Less than 3 years later the natural opiate was identified and named enkephalin by the Scottish research team; endorphin by American researchers. Opiate receptors show up densely in the limbic system. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, pp 64-65, 86)

Enzymes are forms of proteins that speed up (regulate) most biochemical reactions. (Tortora, Gerard J., and Sandra R. Grabowski. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology. NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2003, pp 48-49, G-24)

Enzymes (substances on cell surfaces) act as controllers to destroy information substances as soon as optimum effects have been achieved. They regulate endogenous more effectively than exogenous substances (e.g., methadone, PCP/angel dust, marijuana). (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion (audiocassettes). NY: Sound Ideas, 1997)

Next to dying it has been said that the greatest fear people have is public speaking. (Childre, Doc. Freeze Frame. CA: Planetary Publications, 1194, 1998, p 67)

Consciously or unconsciously we choose how we feel and must take responsibility for this. It is inaccurate to believe that others can make us feel good or bad. (Candace Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 321)

Refer to Emotions and Feelings for additional information.

The brain’s nonconscious filter helps upi to focus as it examines sensory information and decides what to admit to consciousness. There can be some conscious control (e.g., can turn to another radio station). It also scans information to which you are not paying conscious attention in case something important happens (e.g., red lights flash on the car ahead of us). (Wilson, Timothy D. Strangers to Ourselves. England: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2002, p 28)

Peak experiences sometimes referred to as flow (e.g., Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi) or by others as being in the zone, have been associated with physiological changes in the body. These may include the release of adrenalin and endorphins, changes in metabolic rates, alteration in patterns of breathing and heart rate, an increase in alpha wave activity, increased energy, and so on. It comes about through a sense of doing something that feels perfectly natural. Aviator Wilbur Wright described it as a sensation of perfect peace mingled with an excitement that strains every nerve to the utmost. (Robinson, Ken, PhD. The Element. p 90-96. NY: Penguin Books, 2009.)

Outlines 5 steps in freeze-frame technique: Recognize the stressful feeling and take a time out (freeze-frame it); Shift focus to area around your heart for 10 seconds or more; Recall a positive time and attempt to reexperience it; Using your intuition ask your heart what would be a more efficient response; Listen to what your heart says. (Childre, Doc. Freeze Frame. CA: Planetary Publications, 1194, 1998, pp 11, 53)

Emotional peptides signal receptors on blood vessel walls to constrict or dilate and so influence the amount and velocity of blood flow. When emotions are blocked (e.g., denial, repression, trauma) blood flow can become chronically constricted, depriving the frontal cortex and other organs of vital nourishment. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 289)

Glial cells are constantly secreting substances (e.g., peptides) that can nourish neurons or weaken/destroy them. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

The large and small intestines are densely lined with neuropeptides and receptors, providing for a “gut feeling.” The pancreas alone releases about 20 different emotion-laden peptides involved in hunger, satiation, assimilation, and storage of nutrient. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 297)

Emotions and feelings can help us to make wise decisions. The nonconscious mind tries to identify the best course of action and then tries to get our attention through gut. This may be one of the most important functions and contribution of the unconscious mind. (Wilson, Timothy D. Strangers to Ourselves. England: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2002, pp 31-36)

A new discipline called neurocardiology: solid scientific evidence that the heart communicate with the brain in several ways: Neurologically (transmission of nerve impulses); Biochemically (hormones and neurotransmitters); Biophysically (pressure waves). Growing scientific evidence of energetic communication (through electromagnetic field interactions). (Childre, Doc and Howard Martin. The HeartMath Solution. CA: Harper SF, 1999, pp 28-29)

Studies: Evidence that maintaining an alert state is accompanied by a specific pattern of electro-cortical and cardiovascular responses, which both appear to reflect the same activity of one underlying network in the brain. (77-78)

The heart’s electrical waves function much like radio waves. They can be transmitted outside the human body (e.g., you enter and room and sense that two people just had an argument). (Childre, Doc. Freeze Frame. CA: Planetary Publications, 1194, 1998, p 36)

There is no fixed hierarchy in the brain-body connection. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

Study: Extremely homophobic individuals may actually be repressing subconscious homosexual urges. A fear of homosexuality may actual disguise same-sex attractions. (Wilson, Timothy D. Strangers to Ourselves. England: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2002, p 121)

Every hormone is also a neuropeptide or information substance brain chemical. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

Study: Yale epidemiologist, Lisa Berkman PhD. Positive emotional support alters levels of norepinephrine and cortisol in the brain. These chemicals are also believe to influence blood pressure and the heart’s response to stress. (Childre, Doc. Freeze Frame. CA: Planetary Publications, 1194, 1998, p 123)

Two types of mental imagery: preverbal (acts upon one’s own physical being to change its physiological activity); transpersonal (the consciousness of one person can affect the physiological activity of another). (Dossey, Larry. MD. Healing Words. NY: HarperPaperbacks, 1993, pp 65-69)

Imagining something is essentially the same as perceiving it in reality. Imaging sucking a lemon has a direct effect on salivary glands. The effects of imagery on heart rate, blood pressure, blood flow, electrodermal activity, and immune response have all been confirmed in experiments. (Graham, Helen. Discover Color Therapy. CA: Ulysses Press, 1998, p 46)

Many are victims of negative imagination (e.g., students imagine failing) In stressful situations, they allow their minds to fill with negative images that make it impossible for them to succeed. (Williams, Linda. Teaching for the Two-Sided Mind. CA: Touchstone Books: 1986, pp 138-139)

Intelligence is located not only in the brain but in cells that are distributed throughout the body. The immune system has memory and the capacity to learn. The concept of separation of mental processes (including emotions) from the body is no longer valid. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, pp 187-188)

The inter-relationship between the central nervous system and immune system is bidirectional. Products of activated immune cells feed back to the brain and alter neural activity resulting in a “sickness response.” Only the brain can orchestrate such a pervasive array of changes. (PNSA. Watkins, Linda R., and Steven F. Maier.Implications of immune-to-brain communication for sickness and pain. 1988. Article.)

Refer to Immune System for additional Information.

Implicit memory involves brain portions that do not require conscious processing either during encoding or retrieval. Somatosensory (bodily) memory is likely a form of implicit memory. (Siegel, Daniel J. The Developing Mind. NY: The Guilford Press, 1999, pp 28-38)

Every cell is covered with hundreds of thousands of receptor molecules, each capable of binding with a specific informational substance or ligand (e.g., any natural or manmade substance that binds selectively to its own specific receptor on the surface of a cell). The ligand transfers a message into the cell through the receptor molecule. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

This term refers to a specific molecule that binds to a receptor molecule. (Tortora, Gerard J., and Sandra R. Grabowski. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology. NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2003, pp 62, G-23)

Information substances are the basic units of a language used by the cells throughout the organism to communicate across systems such as the endocrine, neurological, gastrointestinal, and even the immune system. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 27)

A structure on the cell surface that can selectively bind to a specific substance, the result of which binding is accompanied by specific physiological effects. (Dorland’s Illustrated Medical Dictionary (29th edition). PA: W. B. Saunders Company, 2000, p 1005)

Information substances can be thought of as chemical keys that dock onto the receptor molecule and cause it to sway. Ligands are generally much smaller molecules than the receptors to which they bind. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, pp 23-25)

Informational substances comprise three groups of chemicals: neurotransmitters, steroids, and peptides. They move from axon to dendritic receptor in a lock-and-key manner. (Howard, Pierce J., PhD. The Owner’s Manual for the Brain GA: Bard Press, 1994, 2000, pp 40-43)

Approximately 300 endogenous information substances have been identified and they are divided into three chemical types: neurotransmitters, steroids, and peptides. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, pp 23-25)

Exogenous substances alter the sensitivity of receptor molecules. They tend to shrink and become less sensitive, and eventually impact endogenous substances as well. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

The brain can interpret events that arise in the body or from the environment (bottom-up) as well as those that originate in the brain (top-down). (Benson, Herbert, MD, with Marge Stark. Timeless Healing. NY: Schribner, 1996, pp 195-198)

Scientists have discovered that the heart is involved in the processing and decoding of intuitive information. Tests done on research subjects showed that the heart appeared to receive intuitive information even before the brain. This could be the basis of saying “Follow you heart and you will never go wrong”. In order to produce deep thought, which helps in improving personal well being, the cerebral brain needs to work with the gastrointestinal system and the heart. When these three work together harmoniously, the likelihood of having a healthy body and a powerful mind is increased. (Source)

Your heart is involved in the processing and decoding of intuitive information. Previous studies by Childre and McCraty (2001) suggested that the heart’s field was directly involved in intuitive perception through its coupling to an energetic information field outside the bounds of space and time. Additional studies provided evidence that both the heart and brain receive and respond to information about a future event before the event actually happens. Even more surprising was that the heart appeared to receive this intuitive information even before the brain received it. (McCraty R, M. Atkinson, and M, Bradley RT (2004, a), Electrophysiological Evidence of Intuition: Part 1. The Surprising Role of the Heart, Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine; 10(1):133-143, 2004; Electrophysiological Evidence of Intuition: Part 2; A System-Wide Process? Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (2004); 10(2):325-336)

Studies show that feelings of happiness and joy increase white blood cell counts needed for healing and defend against invading pathogens, including cancer and virus-infected cells. (Childre, Doc. Freeze Frame. CA: Planetary Publications, 1194, 1998, p 42)

There is likely a life force that makes living things different from nonliving things. It has been labeled the vital force, a version of what I am calling the “L” or life energy that may carry the heart’s code. (Pearsall, Paul, PhD. The Heart’s Code. NY: Broadway Books, 1998, p 39)

Dr. James Lynch identified a relationship between loneliness and virtually every major disease, including cancer, pneumonia, and mental disease. The connection was particularly clear in heart disease. Millions are dying, quite literally, of broken hearts. (Childre, Doc. Freeze Frame. CA: Planetary Publications, 1194, 1998, pp 42-43, 105)

Memories form when a pattern is repeated frequently, or in circumstances that encourage it to be encoded. This is because each time a group of neurons fires together the tendency to do so again is increased. (Carter, Rita. Mapping the Mind. CA: University of California Press, 1999, p 159)

Strong emotional stimuli release hormones and neurotransmitters that help to embed that emotional memory in your neural circuitry. You tend to remember things in relation to how important they are to you and are more likely to recall strong negative emotional states than positive ones. (Childre, Doc and Howard Martin. The HeartMath Solution. CA: Harper SF, 1999, pp 202-203)

Memories are stored not only in the brain but also at the receptor level throughout the psychosomatic network. Memory processes are emotion-driven and unconscious but can sometimes be brought to conscious awareness. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 143)

All cells store information-energetic memories, and the heart is the central organ that constantly pulsates this energy from, between, and to other organs and cells. (Pearsall, Paul, PhD. The Heart’s Code. NY: Broadway Books, 1998, p 14)

Unconscious memories, once formed, impact your in-the-moment perception. In turn, this impacts your body’s biochemistry and hormone production. (Childre, Doc and Howard Martin. The HeartMath Solution. CA: Harper SF, 1999, pp 201-202)

Refer to Memory and the Brain for additional information.

The mind is a constant flow of information between all the cells in our bodies. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

The mind is not the brain, although it depends on the brain for its existence (as far as we know). The mind (e.g., thoughts) can affect the body (e.g., set the heart racing, send hormones surging). (Schwartz, Jeffrey M., MD, and Sharon Begley. The Mind & the Brain. NY Regan Books, 2002, pp 28-40, 243-245)

While the mind alone works incrementally, heart intelligence can bring in whole groups of information at one time. (Childre, Doc. Freeze Frame. CA: Planetary Publications, 1998, p 84)

A molecule, composed of one or more atoms, is the smallest particle of a substance that can still be identified as that substance. Components of molecules of emotion include receptor molecules and ligands (both exogenous and endogenous). They form a powerful, continuously operating, communication system between the brain and the body and with the outside world. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 2103)

Molecules of emotion create altered states of consciousness. Each state can have differing patterns of behavior, memories, postures, facial expressions, and even levels of information substances. From that perspective, we’re all multiple personalities. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

Refer to Neurons and Neurotransmitters for additional information.

The bodymind can repress emotions and behavior. It uses neuropeptides in this process, substances that influence mood. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion (audiocassettes). NY: Sound Ideas, 1997)

All processes that impact on survival (e.g., eating, breathing) are emotionally directed by neuropeptides (a subgroup of peptides). Pain and pleasure signals trigger you move either toward something or away from it. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 297)

Refer to Neurons and Neurotransmitters for additional information.

Nocebo is the opposite side of the coin to remembered wellness and positive placebo effects. Examples include: psychogenic illness, false memories, voodoo death, alien abductions, belief-engendered death, etc. (Benson, Herbert, MD, with Marg Stark. Timeless Healing. NY: Scribner, 1996, pp 294-296)

Peptides are tiny pieces of protein, a string of amino acids, each joined together like beads in a necklace. 2 amino acids in a chain = dipeptide; 100 amino acids in the chain = polypeptide. Over 200 amino acids = a protein. There are different types of peptides (e.g., immunopeptides and neuropeptides). (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

Peptides are chains of amino acids strung together like letters in the alphabet that function as information substances. More than 80 have already been implicated in digestion, breathing, and many other bodily functions. A wide variety of categories include: hormones, neurotransmitters, growth factors, cytokines, and interleukins. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, pp 65-71)

Peptides, substances of low molecular weight, contain at least two or more amino acids that form the constituent parts of proteins. Neuropeptides are a subset, and impact mood. (Dorland’s Illustrated Medical Dictionary (29th edition). PA: W. B. Saunders Company, 2000, p 1348)

All of the known peptides, the information molecules, can be found abundantly in the autonomic nervous system, distributed in subtly different intricate patterns all the way down both sides of your spine. Peptides and their receptors make communication between conscious and unconscious processes possible. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, pp 188-189)

Remembered wellness is a term coined by Dr. Benson (to replace what is often called rather negatively the placebo effect) that more accurately describes brain functions involved when affirmative messages/beliefs positively impact the brain/body toward health and wellness. (Benson, Herbert, MD, with Marg Stark. Timeless Healing. NY: Scribner, 1996, pp 20-22)

The structures of the brain and body are somewhat flexible and can be altered by the mind (e.g., walk across live coals, allergies come and go, the placebo effect where up to 70% of the effects of a medication or treatment is due to the person’s belief). (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

Studies: A person’s conscious beliefs can be disconnected from automatic attitudes that are stored in the unconscious. Research on automatic prejudice is in its infancy. (Wilson, Timothy D. Strangers to Ourselves. England: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2002, p 193)

Every psychoactive drug works because it mimics an internal information substance. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

PNI, tem coined in 1964 by Dr. Robert Ader to describe the brain-body connection. Quotes Jonas Salk as saying: the mind, in addition to medicine, has powers to turn the immune system around. (Hafen, Brent Q., et al. Mind/Body Health. MA: Allyn & Bacon, 1996, p 21)

The various parts of the immune system have nerve connections to the central nervous system. Substantial components of the immune system are under the direct control of the brain. (Greenfield, Susan, Ed. Brain Power. Great Britain: Element books Limited, 1999, p 165)

Receptor molecules orchestrate the development of the brain. Based on what binds to them, development may be affected. Toxins, chemicals, herbicides, and pesticides act as endocrine disrupters and can interfere with the flow of molecular information. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

A structure on the cell surface that can selectively bind to a specific substance, the result of which binding is accompanied by specific physiological effects. (Dorland’s Illustrated Medical Dictionary (29th edition). PA: W. B. Saunders Company, 2000, p 1539)

A molecule on the outer cell membrane that binds with an information substance (ligand) and transmits information into the cell. Every cell is covered with hundreds of thousands of receptor molecules, each one programmed to attract and bind with a particular ligand. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

Every cell is studded with millions of receptor molecules each programmed to attract and bind with information substances (ligands). The receptor molecules vibrate, which alters their contours into from 2 and 4 configurations so they can bind to more than one information substance. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 84)

A specialized cell (or distal portion of a neuron) that responds to a specific sensory modality (e.g., touch, pressure, cold, light, or sound) and converts it to an electrical signal…a specific molecule or cluster of molecules that recognizes and binds a particular ligand. (Tortora, Gerard J., and Sandra R. Grabowski. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology. NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2003, p G-32)

Receptor molecules function pick up sensory information on a cellular level. They hover in the cell membrane waiting to pick messages from other molecules. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 23)

Receptors are large protein molecules that stick out from the surface of the cells (e.g., a lock that is accessed through a keyhole). Neurotransmitters and other substances act as keys that slip into specific keyholes: excitatory (starts an impulse) or inhibitory (stops an impulse in the cell). (Brynie, Faith Hickman. 101 Questions Your Brain Has Asked About Itself But Couldn’t Answer, Until Now. CT: Millbrook Press, 1998, pp 34-36)

Receptor molecules weigh > 50,000 units of molecular weight as compared to a water molecule that weighs 18 units. They can be thought of as keyholes. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 22)

Cannabinoid receptors are abundant in parts of the brain that regulate movement, coordination, learning, and memory, higher cognitive functions such as judgment, and pleasure. Endogenous cannabinoids (or THC in marijuana) attach to cannabinoid receptors and affect the way those cells work. More information is available to the following websites: (https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/marijuana   https://teens.drugabuse.gov/drug-facts/marijuana)

The ability of a receptor to bind with only one kind of ligand helps to keep information in order throughout the brain. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 139)

Receptor molecules know how many times they have been stimulated and whether they have been over stimulated or understimulated. They contain a history of the past (e.g., why we have tendencies toward certain behaviors, thoughts, postures), and affect the flow of information throughout the brain and the body. (Pert, Candace, PhD.Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000;Molecules of Emotion (audiocassettes) NY: Sound Ideas, 1997)

Any change to any portion of the body will trigger a change in the mind as well. Any change in the brain will result in a change somewhere in the body. (Lombard, Jay, Dr., and Dr. Christian Renna. Balance Your Brain, Balance Your life. NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc, 2004, pp 109-112)

Explanation. Explicit self = things we know about consciously. Implicit self = aspects that are inaccessible or just not being accessed at the moment. (LeDoux, Joseph. Synaptic Self, How Our Brains. NY: Penguin Books, 2002, pp 27-29)

Sensory information can influence our behavior subconsciously (e.g., environments that don’t feel right, people who are attractive or unattractive to us). This is true whether or not we can consciously identify reasons. (Carter, Rita, Ed. Exploring Consciousness. CA: University of California Press, 2002, p 115)

Using the mind-body-spirit concept, the concept of spirit may represent the non-physical element or field of the mind that can communicate with the cosmos outside the constraints of space and time. The evidence for such communication comes from a variety of reported phenomena of extra-sensory perception (telepathy, precognition, and clairvoyance), psycho-kinesis, psychic healing, and religious experiences (Radin, D. I. The Conscious Universe: The Scientific Truth of Psychic Phenomena. SF: Harper Edge, 1997: 61-174; Henry, J. Parapsychology, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group: 91- 148, 2005).

People rarely talk about spirituality (does not equate with religion) in mind-body health because it’s difficult to describe and more difficult to research. Soul, mind, and emotions play an important role in health. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, pp 303-304)

Only one core emotion can be in place at a time. We potentially have the ability to be in any state of mind we choose. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000)

Describes three states of consciousness (conscious, subconscious, unconscious) that can be triggered by any of the sensory systems. Provides examples for visual, auditory, and kinesthetic systems. (Markova, Dawna, PhD. The Open Mind, Exploring the 6 Patterns of Natural Intelligence. CA: Conari Press, 1996, pp 58-60)

Sensory data from the body travel to the cortex along very fast pathways that pass (with the exception of olfactory data) through the thalamus. It acts as a type of relay station and triages sensory information to the appropriate decoding center in the cortex. It also helps to direct attention and switches sensory input on and off. (Carter, Rita, Ed. Exploring Consciousness. CA: University of California Press, 1998, pp 29, 115)

Practitioners of therapeutic touch report they can sense subtle energies moving through the bodies of their patients. The energy vibrations may result from ligands binding with receptor molecules in the body. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, pp 224-225)

Being labeled as right-brained, spaced out, or meditational correlates with the brain’s production of mostly theta waves. A form of the unconscious state (as compared to conscious or subconscious) the brain can think in many ways simultaneously. (Markova, Dawna, PhD. The Open Mind, Exploring the 6 Patterns of Natural Intelligence.CA: Conari Press, 1996, pp 28-30)

Thoughts and thoughts alone can increase endorphin levels in the body. Every though you think goes toward the making of your body chemistry. (Fox, Arnold, MD, and Barry Fox, PhD. Wake Up! You’re Alive! FL: Health Communications, 1988, pp 30-32)

Studies: Thoughts, emotions, attitudes, perceptions, and perceived meanings are able to affect the body, profoundly and sometimes dramatically. (Dossey, Larry. MD. Healing Words. NY: HarperPaperbacks, 1993, pp 54-57)

You are the only person who can think in YOUR mind. What you send out verbally or mentally tends to come back to you in a similar form. (Hay, Louise L. You Can Heal Your Life. CA: Hay House, Inc., 1984, pp 40-44)

Transference may be one of Freud’s most important discoveries. It is a social information-processing system that occurs quickly and at a nonconscious level. Provides examples. (Wilson, Timothy D. Strangers to Ourselves. England: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2002, pp 77-78)

Reports from recipients of donated organs: atypical newfound memories, thoughts, emotions and preferences that are not characteristic of the recipient prior to having received the transplanted organ. (D' Alberto, Attilio, BSc (Hons) TCM MATCM. Cellular Memory and ZangFu Theory, Website)

Refer to Cellular Memory for additional information.

Examples of unconscious processes (e.g., heart rate, breathing rhythm, stomach contractions, posture, processing sensory stimuli, thinking, evaluating, judging, believing, imagining). A person may know consciously what someone said without having conscious access to the functions that allowed for the comprehension. (LeDoux, Joseph. Synaptic Self. NY: Penguin Books, 2002, p 11)

The unconscious mind involves mental processes that are inaccessible to consciousness but that influence judgments, feelings, or behavior. Compares this to a computer program that scans the Internet and sends an e-mail message when the information is identified. (Wilson, Timothy D. Strangers to Ourselves. England: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2002, pp 23, 28)

The vagus nerve is one of the longest in your body, running from top to bottom (brain to rectum). Its central purpose is to relay information from internal organs like to gastrointestinal track and heart to the brain. The autonomous nervous system in your GI track allows it to work independently of the brain. While the average brain has nearly 100 billion neurons, the digestive system of the body (gut) has close to 500 million nerve cells and 100 million neurons. The heart-mind interaction takes place both by electrical signals (via the vagus and the spinal chord nerves) and through chemicals (heart is an endocrine gland also). Not only does the gut communicate with the brain chemically (e.g., releasing chemicals that are transported to the brain by the blood) but also by sending electrical signals via the vagus nerve. (Source)

Viruses likely operate as exogenous information substances that bind with specific receptor molecules. Viruses contain various proteins on their surfaces that are important in determining which cells they can infect. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. NY: Scribner, 1997, p 200)

Refer to Visualizing and the Brain for additional information on internal mental picturing.

Studies of white blood cells separated from the rest of the body: there is a reaction in the separated cells (when the donor experiences specific emotions such as anger or fear) even if miles apart. (Sylvia, Claire, with William Novak. A Change of Heart. p 224-226. NY: Little, Brown and Company, 1997.)

Donor’s in vitro oral leukocytes (white blood cells taken from the person’s mouth) registered electrical changes based on the emotions the donor was exhibiting, up to 12 kilometers between the test tube of leukocytes and the donor. The demonstrated biocommunication may represent a signal that is a new form of communication or a new type of energy. (Reproduced from The International Journal of Biosocial Research Publication Office, P O Box 1174, Tacoma, WA, 98401-1174 USA. Source)

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