Sugar and the Brain

Sugar, white flour, and refined carbohydrates are addictive substances that have similar effects on brain neurotransmitters as alcohol. They can produce a temporary high through an increase in dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine. Contains a set of questions on pp 7-8 to help identify whether or not you are a sugarholic. (Appleton, Nancy, PhD. Lick the Sugar Habit, pp 114-118NY: Avery Penguin Putnam, 1996.)

Sugar is high on the list for being addictive. To avoid sugar cravings, keep the blood sugar fairly even. Eating a good, well-balanced diet helps eliminate sugar craving. Exercise and B vitamins can help, as can eating a few nuts. (Padus, Emrika, et al. The Complete Guide to Your Emotions & Your Health, pp 369-375.PA: Rodale Press, 1986.)

Sugar craving can trigger a vicious cycle. To avoid sugar pangs keep the blood sugar fairly even. Try eating a few nuts when the urge for sugar gets strong. (Padus, Emrika, et al. The Complete Guide to Your Emotions & Your Health. p 542-544. PA: Rodale Press, 1992.)

Sugar can act like a drug. As you decrease the amount you consume you may experience withdrawal symptoms (e.g., headaches, irritability, nausea, and anxiety). Eliminate processed sugar from your diet in “cold turkey” fashion. The symptoms will last for a few days and then you will begin to feel much better. (Kaiser, Jon D., MD. Immune Power. p 30. NY: St. Martin’s Press, 1993.)

Satisfy cravings for sweets with fruit, which has a different type of sugar (fructose) that less readily causes the release of insulin. (Pert, Candace, PhD.Molecules of Emotion. p 322-323. NY: Scribner, 1997.)

Sugar is a drug that can become addictive. The body produces sugar in the form of glucose, the only fuel the brain requires to function. Using sugar (an artificial form of glucose) for a quick pick-me-up is analogous to shooting heroin. Sugar floods and desensitizes receptors and interferes with feedback loops that regulate the availability of instant energy (e.g., glycogen release from the liver). (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. p 298-300. NY: Scribner, 1997.)

Sugar and alcohol, both of which could be considered drugs (at least technically), cause the body to be depleted of “B” vitamins. (Dychtwald, Ken, PhD., ed.Wellness and Health Promotion for the Elderly, p 191. MD: Aspen Publication, 1986.)

In its pure form most alcohol (except cordials or after-dinner drinks) has little sugar but it takes the same pathway in the body as sugar. Alcohol has such a simple chemistry that it passes directly into the bloodstream, much like a simple sugar. A study by Dr. Ruth Adams has shown a correlation between sugar addiction and addiction to alcohol. (Appleton, Nancy, PhD. Lick the Sugar Habit, pp 21, 112-118NY: Avery Penguin Putnam, 1996.)

Eating lots of sugar with resulting high blood sugar levels can maker your entire body age faster. Blood glucose reacts with proteins to create cross-linked proteins called AGEs (advanced glycosylation end products) that generate free radicals and are as dangerous to the brain as damage from oxygen free radicals. (Carper, Jean. Your Miracle Brain, p 135NY: HarperCollins Publishers, 2000.)

White sugar is an almost chemically pure substance that is rapidly absorbed and has a powerful effect on body chemistry. It contributes only calories and no nutrients. With no lasting satiety value it is conducive to consuming far more calories than desirable. (Dychtwald, Ken, PhD., ed. Wellness and Health Promotion for the Elderly. p 182. MD: Aspen Publication, 1986.)

In its pure form most alcohol (except cordials or after-dinner drinks) has little sugar but it takes the same pathway in the body as sugar. Alcohol has such a simple chemistry that it passes directly into the bloodstream, much like a simple sugar. A study by Dr. Ruth Adams has shown a correlation between sugar addiction and addiction to alcohol. (Appleton, Nancy, PhD. Lick the Sugar Habit, pp 21, 112-118NY: Avery Penguin Putnam, 1996.)

Some individuals can exhibit allergic reactions to sugar (e.g., joint pain, headaches, hyperactivity, initial high and then a groggy-heavy feeling). (Ross, Julia, MA. The Diet Cure, p 74. NY:Penguin Books, 1999.)

Contains tables of many foods showing calories, grams of sugar, and equivalent teaspoons. Very enlightening and easy to use. (Appleton, Nancy, PhDLick the Sugar Habit, Sugar Counter. p 33-202. NY Avery Penguin Putnam, 2001.)

The average American consumes 20 pounds of artificial sweeteners per year. Originally designed for weight loss, research shows that they actually increase appetite by stimulating the salivary glands, thus defeating their original purpose. (Appleton, Nancy, PhD. Lick the Sugar Habit, Sugar Counter. p 17. NY Avery Penguin Putnam, 2001.)

Artificial sweeteners can contribute to compulsive eating, an increased craving for sweets and fatty foods, and an increase in weight. Examples: Aspartame’s ingredients compete with Tryptophan and can block its conversion into serotonin; saccharin can cause an increase in one’s consumption of sweets. (Ross, Julia, MA. The Diet Cure, pp 36-37. NY: Penguin Books, 1999.)

Too much aspartame (NutraSweet) may cause fluid retention and slow down weight loss in people who are trying to lose weight. (Bost, Brent W., MD, FACOG.Hurried Woman Syndrome, p 68.NY: Vantage Press, 2001.)

NutraSweet and aspartame: symptoms (e.g., impaired learning, headaches, seizures) may show up only after prolonged use of the sweetener. Females may be affected more than males. (Healy, Jane M., PhD. Endangered Minds, 166-168.NY: Simon & Schuster, 1990)

Examples of sugar substitutes (each has some potential risk):

  • Saccharin (Sugar Twin, Sprinkle Twin, Sweet ’n Low) is 300 times sweeter than table sugar.
  • Aspartame (Equal, NutraSweet, NatraTaste) is 180 times sweeter than table sugar (sucrose)
  • Acesulfame-K (Ace K, Sunnett, Sweeet One) is 200 times sweeter than sucrose
  • Stevia is 15 –300 times sweeter than sucrose
  • SucaFlore (combination of FOS, soy extract, and potato startch)
  • Sucralose (Splenda) is 600 times sweeter than sucrose
  • Sugar alcohol (Mannitol, Sorbitol, Xylitol, Maltitol).

(Appleton, Nancy, PhD. Lick the Sugar Habit, Sugar Counter, pp 17-20. NY Avery Penguin Putnam, 2001.)

Thiamine is essential for metabolizing sugar, and eating too much sugar-laden food and beverages depletes thiamine levels. Symptoms of thiamine deficiency range from neuropathy to beriberi. (Editors of Prevention Magazine. Complete Book of Vitamins: All New Edition. p 1226-127. PA: Rodale Press, 1984.)

Sugar and alcohol, both of which could be considered drugs (at least technically), cause the body to be depleted of “B” vitamins. (Dychtwald, Ken, PhD., ed.Wellness and Health Promotion for the Elderly, p 191. MD: Aspen Publication, 1986.)

The total sugar content normally present in your bloodstream is approximately one teaspoon. Consuming a can of soda or bowl of ice cream (e.g., average 12 teaspoons sugar) causes the pancreas to work hard excreting insulin, and the stress is not good for the immune system. (Kaiser, Jon D., MD. Immune Power. p 28-29. NY: St. Martin’s Press, 1993.)

The most common response to hypoglycemia (low levels of blood sugar) is to eat another sugar snack, although this will drive the blood sugar up quickly again. It takes the brain another 45-75 minutes to regain normal intellectual function after the blood sugar returns to normal. (Nedley, Neil, M.D. Proof Positive. p 273-275. OK:Nedley, 1998, 1999.)

Caffeine can increase the amount of sugar in the bloodstream and provide a temporary “lift.” The rush of insulin, however, causes the sugar level to subsequently fall below normal causing extreme fatigue. It may be hours before the body’s chemistry returns to normal. (Appleton, Nancy, PhD. Lick the Sugar Habit. p 116-118. NY: Avery Penguin Putnam, 1996.)

A quick dose of sugar causes blood sugar to rise rapidly. To compensate, the body releases insulin, forcing the blood sugar level to plummet. The end result? Another sugar attack. Common side effects include nervousness, crankiness, headaches, and bad dreams. (Padus, Emrika, et al. The Complete Guide to Your Emotions & Your Health. p 371. PA: Rodale Press, 1986.)

Each food has its own distinctive abilities to raise blood sugar (e.g., dates spike rapidly, dried apricots or raw/cooked/canned carrots do not). Eating white potatoes or regular white bread is just like eating candy as far as your body knows. (Carper, Jean. Your Miracle Brain. p 123-126. NY: HarperCollins Publishers, Inc., 2000.)

Sugar can be toxic. Inflammatory chemicals spread throughout the brain and body following a rise in blood sugar. They produce enzymes that break down collagen. This can cause wrinkles in the skin and damage to the brain. (Perricone, Nicholas, MD. The Perricone Promise. p 12-13. NY:Warner Books, 2004.)

Sugar can alter one’s ability to think clearly. (Appleton, Nancy, PhD. Lick the Sugar Habit, pp 68-76NY: Avery Penguin Putnam, 1996.)

Study: For sustained performance, refined sugar was not brain food at all, just the opposite. (Nedley, Neil, M.D. Proof Positive. p 273-275. OK:Nedley, 1998, 1999.)

Sugar can negatively impact the brain. (Appleton, Nancy, PhD. Lick the Sugar Habit. p 68-76. NY:Avery Penguin Putnam, 1996.)

Glycation is the term for a form of age-related damage to the brain resulting from persistent high blood sugar from a high-glycemic-index diet. (Carper, Jean. Your Miracle Brain. p 125-126. NY: HarperCollins Publishers, 2000.)

Brain research has shown that what children eat profoundly affects their behavior and ability to learn. Carbohydrates with a high glycemic index build up serotonin quickly but are followed by jitters or feeling low. Boys tend to become impulsive, girls temporarily withdrawn and distracted. (Gurian, Michael, PhD, and Patricia Henley, with Terry Trueman. Boys and Girls Learn Differently! p 86-88. CA: Jossey-Bass, 2001.)

Large amounts of sugar in the diet can impair frontal lobe functions in school age children. (Nedley, Neil, M.D. Proof Positive. p 273-275. OK: Nedley, 1998, 1999.)

Studies: Dr. Powers found that blood sugar levels consistently correspond to behavior and performance in school Sugar made them (children) irritable or listless. (Editors, Prevention Magazine. Complete Book of Vitamins. p 664-665. PA: Rodale Press, 1984.)

Refer to Care of the Brain for additional information.

The average person consumes 20% - 25% of his/her calories from some form of refined sugar. Reports on negative effect of sugar on the calcium-phosphorus ratio as first discovered by Dr. Melvin Page, a dentist. (Appleton, Nancy, PhD.Lick the Sugar Habit. p 21-24. NY: Avery Penguin Putnam, 1996.)

White sugar is an almost chemically pure substance that is rapidly absorbed and has a powerful effect on body chemistry. It contributes only calories and no nutrients. With no lasting satiety value it is conducive to consuming far more calories than desirable. (Dychtwald, Ken, PhD., ed. Wellness and Health Promotion for the Elderly. p 182. MD: Aspen Publication, 1986.)

Links sugar consumption to eight types of cancer: colon, rectal, breast, ovarian, uterine, prostate, kidney, and cancers of the nervous system. (Nedley, Neil, M.D.Proof Positive. p 184-185. OK: Nedley, 1998, 1999.)

Avoid excessive amounts of sugar including fructose, which raises blood insulin levels, damaging arteries and possibly promoting cancer, as well as other degenerative diseases. (Carper, Jean. Stop Aging Now! p 312. NY:HarperCollins, 1996.)

Sugar suppresses the immune system. Glucose is cancer’s preferred fuel. (Leduc, Mark, 2002.)

Glucose is cancer’s preferred fuel. (Mercola, Joseph, 2003.)

Candida albicans is a fungus that is occasionally present in the mouth and can overgrow (e.g., thrush) when a person’s immune system is weakened. The most important aspects of prevention program are avoidance of sugar, alcohol, and dairy products. All three provide simple sugars for the fungus to feed upon. (Kaiser, Jon D., MD. Immune Power. p 28, 168-169. NY: St. Martin’s Press, 1993.)

Many people are confused about the differences among sucrose, fructose, and high fructose corn syrup. As Cathe Olson wrote in her article Sugar, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Agave Nectar: Which Should You Choose? excessive amounts of any of them can lead to a wide range of health problems. The USDA's Food Guide Pyramid recommends limiting added sugars to 12 teaspoons per day. Estimates are that Americans consume three times the recommended amount.The author reported (with a bibliography) that pesticides have been linked to many health problems including infertility, birth defects, and cancer. Therefore, she personally chooses to avoid sweeteners that may contain pesticides, herbicides, chemical bleaching agents, and genetic engineering; using instead organically-grown, unbleached cane sugar and organic raw agave nectar. Because high fructose corn syrup is unavailable in organic form, she does not use it. Each person will need to make a decision about sweeteners and Olson's article may help to shed light on the pros and cons. (Source)

Carbo-fats (e.g., sugar, alcohol) trigger excess insulin, convert to excess cholesterol, and form the bulk of the excess triglycerides that clog the arteries. (Ross, Julia, MA. The Diet Cure. p 109-111. NY:Penguin Books, 1999.)

Sugar can destroy dietary chromium. High sugar can spike blood insulin, accelerating aging. Table sugar or high fructose corn syrup (in soft drinks and other processed foods) and notably both together, wash chromium out of the body worsening borderline deficiencies. (Carper, Jean. Stop Aging Now! p 74-85. NY: HarperCollins, 1996.)

Per UC’s Berkeley Wellness Letter estimating the average American consumed more than 133 pounds of sugar in 1985. (Appleton, Nancy, PhD. Lick the Sugar Habit. p 14-16. NY: Avery Penguin Putnam, 1996.)

Sugar consumption in the United States is approximately 125 pounds per capita per year. (Editors Prevention Magazine. Complete Book of Vitamins. p 592. PA: Rodale Press, 1984.)

Average sugar consumption in the United States is 1 pound per person every 3 days, or 128 pounds per year. (Kaiser, Jon D., MD. Immune Power. p 31. NY: St. Martin’s Press, 1993.)

An insulin spike from simple-sugar foods can suppress your immune system for five (5) hours. And sugar has also been shown to feed cancer cells. (Gary Kaplan, D.O., founder of The Kaplan Center for Integrative Medicine in McLean, Virginia)

Sugar is an artificial stimulant that, over time, damages your body’s ability to produce its own energy. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Your Body is Your Subconscious Mind (audiocassettes). CO: Sounds True, 2000.)

White sugar and white flour burn up vitamins and minerals without replacing them, lower immunity, foul up the digestive tract, and complicate diabetes, kidney stones, osteoporosis, and cause fatigue. (Editors Prevention Magazine. Complete Book of Vitamins: All New Edition. p 597. PA: Rodale Press, 1984.)

Study: After eating candy, the energy level dropped even lower within an hour and was associated with feelings of tense-tiredness. (Restak, Richard, MD. Mozart’s Brain and the Fighter Pilot. p 130-131. NY: Harmony Books, 2001.)

Eating sugar gives a quick rush of energy followed by a big drop as the body reacts to the excess sugar by driving down blood sugar and energy levels. (Fox, Arnold, MD, and Barry ox, PhD. Wake Up! You’re Alive! p 62-64. FL: Health Communications, 1988.)

The human body primarily gets its energy from metabolizing sugar (closely related to sucrose or common table sugar). It is transported to the cells in the form of glucose. Metabolism is an intelligent act. (Chopra, Deepak, MD. Ageless Body, Timeless Mind. p 124-130. NY: Harmony Books, 1993.)

Eating sugar gives a quick rush of energy followed by a big drop as the body reacts to the excess sugar by driving down blood sugar and energy levels. (Fox, Arnold, MD, and Barry Fox, PhD. Wake Up! You’re Alive! p 62-64. FL: Health Communications, 1988.)

Although the brain is only about 2% of the body’s entire weight, it can consume 20%-30% of the body’s entire energy. The brain stores so little glucose or energy that it would be all used up within 10 minutes if not replenished. The type of sugar (glucose) that circulates in your blood is critical and is largely determined by what you eat. (Carper, Jean. Your Miracle Brain. p 106-107. NY: HarperCollins Publishers, 2000.)

Refer to Energy and the Brain for additional information.

Israeli researchers: eating excessive fructose (e.g., in fruit, fruit juices, honey, corn syrup in processed foods) may be even worse for the body than eating either sucrose or glucose. (Carper, Jean. Your Miracle Brain. p 135-136. NY: HarperCollins Publishers, 2000.)

Fruit juice (squeezed, frozen, or canned) contains simple sugar (e.g., 12 ounces of freshly squeezed orange juice contains about the same amount of sugar as a 12-oz soft drink). It gets into the bloodstream quickly upsetting the body chemistry and suppressing the immune system. It’s better to eat the fruit fresh and whole. (Appleton, Nancy, PhD. Lick the Sugar Habit, Sugar Counter. p 23-24. NY Avery Penguin Putnam, 2001.)

Sugar/glucose is metabolized in the digestive track and processed in cells. It stimulates the production of insulin, a step required for the conversion of sugar into energy. (See Fructose for additional information.) (Cohen, Mark Francis.What’s Worse Than Sugar? p 18-19. AARP Bulletin, April 2004.)

Kathleen Page and colleagues at the University of Southern California, studied the effects of glucose and fructose on the hypothalamus—the appetite control center, which responds to hormones (e.g., leptin in particular) that tell the brain you are full. When study participants consumed a drink containing only glucose, blood flow and activity in the hypothalamus decreased and they reported feeling full. When the same participants were fed a fructose drink, the hypothalamus remained active and they did not report feeling full. The brain still thought the body was hungry. (Gameau, Damon. The Sugar Book. P. 121. NY:Flatiron Books, 2015)

Foods that are high on the glycemic index can lead to insulin resistance, high blood pressure, clogged arteries, heart attacks, strokes, possibly even Alzheimer Disease, all of which impact the brain. (Carper, Jean. Your Miracle Brain. p 125-126. NY:HarperCollins Publishers, 2000.)

Lists in table form how much some common foods spike blood sugar in terms of minimal through maximal glycemic index ranges. (Small, Gary, MD. The Memory Bible. p 155-156. NY: Hyperion, 2002.)

Guide to the Glycemic Index. Contains a section filled with suggestions for losing weight without dieting, which doesn’t work long term anyway. Contains tables that list high and low glycemic foods. (Brand-Miller, Jennie, PhD, Thomas M. S. Wolever, MD, PhD, et al. The New Glucose Revolution. p 174-195. NY: Marlowe & Company, 2003.)

Glycation is the term for a form of age-related damage to the brain resulting from persistent high blood sugar from a high-glycemic-index diet. (Carper, Jean. Your Miracle Brain. p 125-126. NY: HarperCollins Publishers, 2000.)

Lists 110 ways in which sugar can ruin your health such as:

  • Exacerbate PMS
  • Worsen symptoms of ADD
  • Promote elevation of LDL
  • Impair DNA structure

(Appleton, Nancy, PhD. Lick the Sugar Habit, Sugar Counter. p 15-17. NY: Avery Penguin Putnam, 2001.)

Since 1976 (when the sugar industry found it was cheaper to make sugar from corn than from beets or cane) high-fructose corn syrup has replace sucrose as a sweetener in most soft drinks, baked goods, and processed goods. Fructose can reduce the ability of white blood cells to defend against harmful foreign invaders. (Appleton, Nancy, PhD. Lick the Sugar Habit. p 56-57. NY: Avery Penguin Putnam, 1996.)

High-fructose corn syrups are often used to sweeten soft drinks, giving fructose access to human brains, including young formative brains. In 1996 the average American drank over 53 gallons of soft drinks. The average 12-oz non-diet soft drink or cola contains about 10 teaspoons of sugar. (Carper, Jean. Your Miracle Brain. p 25, 136-138. NY:HarperCollins Publishers, 2000.)

It’s important to read labels! High fructose corn syrup contains about 5% more fructose (than sugar). HFCS does not stimulate insulin production (e.g., some are concerned about potential negative effects to the brain). HFCS goes directly to the liver, which releases enzymes that trigger fat storage. HFCS may promote overeating, elevate triglyceride levels, slow fat burning, and cause weight gain. (Cohen, Mark Francis. What’s Worse Than Sugar? p 18-19. AARP Bulletin, April 2004. www.aarp.org/bulletin)

While earlier research has revealed how fructose harms the body through its role in diabetes, obesity and fatty liver, this study is the first to uncover how the sweetener influences the brain. A new study showed that a high-fructose diet harms the brain as well as the body. Eating a high-fructose diet over the long term alters your brain's ability to learn and remember information. (http://newsroom.ucla.edu/portal/ucla/this-is-your-brain-on-sugar-ucla-233992.aspx)

Sugar impacts the immune system by suppressing phagocytes and can occur from: (all types of sugar), glucose, fructose, honey, maple sugar, corn syrup, dextrose, dextrin, rice syrup, barley malt, and fruit juice concentrates. (Summary article: Appleton, Nancy, PhD.Lick the Sugar Habit, Sugar Counter. NY: Avery Penguin Putnam, 2001. Lick the Sugar Habit. NY: Avery Penguin Putnam, 1996.)

Studies: 14 bacteria are engulfed by each white blood cell if participant ingested no sugar, with progressive declines in the number of bacteria engulfed as sugar consumption increased. Ingesting 24 teaspoons of sugar (equivalent of two cans of soda) produced a 92% decrease in white blood cell’s ability to engulf bacteria. (Kaiser, Jon D., MD. Immune Power. p 28-30. NY:St. Martin’s Press, 1993.)

Study: Sugar decreases the ability of white blood cells to immobilize bacteria. After 100 grams of glucose was injected into an animal, the ability of white blood cells to ingest bacteria fell from 14 bacteria to 1. The equivalent of a human eating 18 teaspoons of sugar at one time resulted in an 85% decrease in the Phagocytic Index (e.g., one slice of cherry/berry pie or one 4-oz slice of iced chocolate cake averages 10 teaspoons of sugar). (Kijak, Ernest, and George Foust, and Ralph Steinman. CA: California State Dental Association, 32:349S.)

Your immune system is the most sensitive system of your body to your energy level. For energy, completely avoid white sugar, alcohol, cigarettes, white flour, etc. (Kaiser, Jon D., MD. Immune Power. p 20-22. NY: St. Martin’s Press, 1993.)

The negative dietary habits that cause the most problems to the immune system (weaken it) are the excessive consumption of sugar, caffeine, and alcohol (especially if combined with skipping breakfast and an inadequate protein intake). (Kaiser, Jon D., MD. Immune Power. p 28-30. NY: St. Martin’s Press, 1993.)

Refined sugars, chocolate, candy, syrups, and all artificial sweets are anti-immunity foods. Avoid them to minimize your risk of diet-induced cancer and to promote maximum immune readiness. (Weiner, Michael A., PhD. Maximum Immunity. p 87. MA: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1986.)

White blood cells, including T-helper cells, are adversely affected by excessive amounts of sugar in the bloodstream. Studies: the greatest effects occurred between one and two hours after a liquid sugar meal, but ability was depressed for up to 5 hours afterwards. (Jon D., MD. Immune Power. p 28-30. NY: St. Martin’s Press, 1993.)

If a person consumed no sugar for 12 hours, each white blood cell could destroy an average of fourteen bacteria. When 24 teaspoons of sugar were ingested (average amount in a medium piece of cheesecake or a milk shake) the white blood cells were so compromised they could only destroy an average of one bacterium each, a 92% reduction. (Nedley, Neil, M.D. Proof Positive. p 184-185. OK: Nedley. 1998, 1999.)

The more sugar you take in, the more of it you must process, and that requires more insulin. All sugars can equally boost insulin needs: ordinary table sugar, sugar in cakes and cookies, as well as fructose in fruit and fruit juices and honey. (Carper, Jean. Stop Aging Now! p 284-285. NY: HarperCollins, 1996.)

Sugar overloading can lead to job dissatisfaction, even in offices that are relatively stress-free. Padus, Emrika, et al. The Complete Guide to Your Emotions & Your Health: New Dimensions. PA: Rodale Press, 1986, p. 374

Lists at least three dozen sugar aliases to help identify sugar on product labels. (Appleton, Nancy, PhDLick the Sugar Habit, Sugar Counter. p 15-17. NY:Penguin Putnam, 2001.)

Leukocytic Index (LI) The LI is a measure of how many organisms one leukocyte can eat in an hour: if a leukocyte eats 10 organisms in an hour, its Leukocytic index is 10. Sugar compromises the effectiveness of leukocytes. (Groves, Barry, 2002.)

Studies: When competing for scant supplies of glucose the limbic system wins and the cerebral cortex starves; emotional behavior dominates and rational behavior is pushed into the background. (Howard, Pierce J., PhD. The Owner’s Manual for the Brain. p 96-97. GA: Bard Press, 1994, 2000.)

Sugar releases the same beta-endorphins (opiods and endorphins) as love. So when you stop eating sugar, you may feel like you are going through a break-up. This is normal. (Gameau, Damon. The Sugar Book. P. 68-69, 133. NY:Flatiron Books, 2015)

Sugar is broken down in the digestive track and processed in cells. The glucose stimulates insulin production needed to convert sugar into energy (see Fructose). (Cohen, Mark Francis. What’s Worse Than Sugar? p 18-19. AARP Bulletin, April 2004.)

Read labels. And when you do, know that there are many different labels for “sugar.” These include: Evaporated Cane Juice, organic palm sugar, fruit juice concentrate, raw organic cane sugar, apple juice concentrate, fruit puree, cane syrup, beet sugar, caster sugar, crystalline fructose, blackstrap molasses, grape sugar, invert sugar, fruit juice, turbinado sugar, maple syrup. According to Professsor Barry Popkin at the University of North Carolina: “People need to understand that whether sugar is white, brown, raw, high fructose corn syrup, or fruit juice concentrate, all have equal effects on your health.” (Gameau, Damon. The Sugar Book. P. 138. NY:Flatiron Books, 2015)

White sugar is an almost chemically pure substance that is rapidly absorbed and has a powerful effect on body chemistry. It contributes only calories and no nutrients. With no lasting satiety value it is conducive to consuming far more calories than desirable. (Dychtwald, Ken, PhD., ed. Wellness and Health Promotion for the Elderly. p 182. MD:Aspen Publication, 1986.)

Refer to Nutrition and the Brain for additional information.

Refined white sugar changes the profile of peptides released from the pancreas (in addition to insulin), that results in a sluggish, fat-storing mode. Satisfy sweet cravings with fruit, which has a different type of sugar (fructose) that less readily causes the release of insulin. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. p 322-323. NY: Scribner, 1997.)

Contains reports on two different research projects at Loma Linda University to evaluate effects of sugar on the phagocytic index. (Appleton, Nancy, PhD. Lick the Sugar Habit. p 51-56.NY: Avery Penguin Putnam, 1996.)

Research has shown that all sugars lower the phagocytic index (similar to the Leukocytic Index). The index is proportional to the amount of glucose ingested. (Editors of Prevention Magazine. Complete Book of Vitamins. p 666. PA: Rodale Press, 1984.)

Sugar can be toxic. Inflammatory chemicals spread throughout the brain and body following a rise in blood sugar. They produce enzymes that break down collagen. This can cause wrinkles in the skin and damage to the brain. (Perricone, Nicholas, MD. The Perricone Promise. p 12-13. NY: Warner Books, 2004.)

Sugar raises triglycerides. Avoid refined sugars like white sugar, honey, molasses, and soft drinks, deserts and candies that utilize those sweeteners. (Nedley, Neil, M.D. Proof Positive. p 79. OK: Nedley, 1998, 1999.)

If a person consumed no sugar for 12 hours, each white blood cell could destroy an average of fourteen bacteria. When 24 teaspoons of sugar were ingested (average amount in a medium piece of cheesecake or a milk shake) the white blood cells were so compromised they could only destroy an average of one bacterium each, a 92% reduction. (Nedley, Neil, M.D. Proof Positive. p 184-185. OK: Nedley. 1998, 1999.)

Many studies report drops in violent acts when, for example, residents of detention centers are fed low-or no-sugar diets. (Howard, Pierce J., PhD. The Owner’s Manual for the Brain. p 96-97. GA: Bard Press, 1994, 2000.)

Sugar is implicated in a long chain of events in the body that leads to weight gains. Eliminate sugar and other refined foods to lose pounds or keep from gaining unnecessary weight. (Appleton, Nancy, PhD. Lick the Sugar Habit. p 93-96. NY: Avery Penguin Putnam, 1996.)

White blood cells, including T-helper cells, are adversely affected by excessive amounts of sugar in the bloodstream. Studies: the greatest effects occurred between one and two hours after a liquid sugar meal, but ability was depressed for up to 5 hours afterwards. (Jon D., MD. Immune Power. p 28-30. NY:St. Martin’s Press, 1993.)

If a person consumed no sugar for 12 hours, each white blood cell could destroy an average of fourteen bacteria. When 24 teaspoons of sugar were ingested (average amount in a medium piece of cheesecake or a milk shake) the white blood cells were so compromised they could only destroy an average of one bacterium each, a 92% reduction. (Nedley, Neil, M.D. Proof Positive. p 184-185. OK: Nedley. 1998, 1999.)

A low-glycemic-index type of sugar made from hardwoods (not corn). May be an option for diabetics. (Source.)

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