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Studies: Ecstasy is neurotoxic. It can destroy nerve cells and affect areas of the brain responsible for learning and memory (e.g., damage can persist up to 7 years after its use, including permanent damage to neurons that produce serotonin). (Restak, Richard, MD. The Secret Life of the Brain. p 86. Washington D.C.: The Dana Press and Joseph Henry Press, 2001.)

Studies: ecstasy users are at risk for dehydration, hypertension, hyperthermia, and heart or kidney failure. The drug can damage nerves in the brain’s serotonin system, and appears to produce long-term deficits in memory and cognition. (Williams, Jill S., Contributing writer. Prenatal Exposure to Ecstasy May Impair Memory and Cognition. p 8-9. NIDA NOTES, National Institute on Drug Abuse. http://www.drugabuse.gov/)

MDMA or ecstasy can destroy axon terminals of neurons that contain 5-HT, a substance involved in learning and memory. (Greenfield, Susan, Con. Ed. Brain Power. p 167. Great Britain: Element Books Limited, 1999.)

Studies: Ecstasy stimulates the release of serotonin in the brain, producing a euphoric high and weak LSD-like effects that can last several hours. Habit-forming and subject to compulsive abuse, it can increase blood pressure to dangerous levels. Long-term use can cause sharp increases in body temperature, leading to kidney and liver failure. (Restak, Richard, MD. The Secret Life of the Brain. p 86. Washington D.C.: The Dana Press and Joseph Henry Press, 2001.)

Studies: Brain imaging showed an association between ecstasy abuse and decrease in gray matter in areas of the brain that affect breathing, heartbeat, language, and movement. Heavy use may be associated with persistent deficits in problem-solving and speed of mental processing. (Eisner, Robin, Contributing writer. Study Suggests Cognitive Deficits in MDMA-Only Drug Abusers. p 10-11. NIDA NOTES, National Institute on Drug Abuse. Volume 19, Number 5, January 2005. http://www.drugabuse.gov/)