Water and the Brain

Aging and water are directly related. The water content of the body decreases with age. The outward signs of aging (visible wrinkling and withering) are an indicator of what is happening on the inside of the body. At the cellular level, aging causes a shift in the ratio of water inside versus outside the cell. As the volume of water inside the cell is reduced, the cells "wither" just like the skin on the outside of the body. (Jhon, Mu Shik, PhD. The Water Puzzle and the Hexagonal Key. p 69-70. UT: Uplifting Press, Inc., 2004. Translated from Korean by M. J. Pangman.)

Water is the body’s main source of energy. Water flows through cell membranes providing electrical energy much like the turbines in a hydroelectric plant. Sufficient water is important in order for a person to have ongoing energy, especially during the aging process. (Batmanghelikj, F., MD. Your Body's Many Cries for Water. VA:Global Health Solutions, Inc.; Third Edition. 2008. Batmanghelikj, F., MD. Water: For Health, for Healing, for Life: You're Not Sick, You're Thirsty! NY: Grand Central Publishing, 2003.)

 

Recommended total water intake per day (from water, beverages, and food):

  • Women: approximately 2.7 liters (91 ounces)
  • Men: Approximately 3.7 liters (125 ounces)

(Institute of Medicine, Food, and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate. Accessed May, 2009).

As a general rule, drink half your body weight (pounds) in ounces of water each day. For example, if you weight 150 pounds, drink 75 ounces (about nine eight-ounces glasses) of water every day. (Pangman, M. J., MS.  Hexagonal Water - The Ultimate Solution. p 46-47. UT:Uplifting Press, 2005.)

For inactive people in temperate climates, daily water needs are as small as 1000 to 2000 ml. For most moderately active individual, daily water needs are 3000 to 5000 ml. Extended intense exercise can increase the need to 10,000 ml. During exercise, sweat loss commonly ranges from 500 to 2000 ml per hour. Additional water loss occurs through the lungs in breathing and urine. Athletes should replace fluids during activity in order to limit their fluid deficit to less than 2% of euhydrated body weight. (Casa, D. J, et al. American College of Sports Medicine Roundtable on Hydration and Physical Activity: Consensus Statements. Curr Sports Med Rep. 2005: 4:115-117.)

Studies: healthy adults should drink one milliliter of water for every calorie they burn. The average man who burns about 2,900 calories a day should have about 12 cups. A woman who burns 2,200 calories daily needs about 9 cups. (One 8-ounce measuring cup of water equals 236 milliliters of water.) Increase your water intake when you’re active in hot or humid weather. (Mayo Clinic Report. Vibrant Life. MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, Sept/Oct 2000, p 5.)

Most research recommends at least 64 ounces of water per day. Some beverages like no-sodium club soda and herbal tea may also count toward your water intake but beverages that contain caffeine are dehydrating and shouldn’t be counted. (Sklare, John H., Ed. D. The Big Deal with Water. Daily Inspiration, January 29, 2007. Article.)  

Drinking water before a meal may reduce calorie intake. Study: a water preload (e.g., 500 ml for males; 375 ml for females) results in a significantly lower caloric intake for the older group (but not for the younger group age 21-35 year of age). (Van Welleghen .L., et al. Pre-meal Water Consumption Reduced Meal Energy Intake in Older but not Younger Subjects. Obesity. 15:93-97. 2007.)

Drinking a glass of water 20-30 minutes before each meal not only helps to prevent water rationing, but also helps the body to distinguish between thirst and hunger. This is important for those who are trying to maintain optimum weight since most people tend to eat less at a meal when they drink water first. (Pangman, M. J., MS. Hexagonal Water - The Ultimate Solution. p 46-47. UT:Uplifting Press, 2005.)

Water is the most important essential for life. Humans lose approximately one pint of water each day just from exhaling. The human brain is over 90% water and the body over 70%. (Water: The Misunderstood Nutrient. Alternative Medicine Angel. Article.)

Dehydration is the most common fluid and electrolyte problem among the elderly. (Lavizzo-Mourey, Risa J.. “Dehydration in the Elderly: A Short Review.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2625510/)

Water deprivation kills faster than lack of any other nutrient. (Boeckner, Linda, and Kay McKinzie. “Water: The Nutrient.” (Accessed Oct ’14) http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/epublic/live/g918/build/)

Many health problems are the result of dehydration. Many of the liquids people drink instead of water actually dehydrate the body. (Fox, Martin, PhD. Healthy Water for a longer life.Healthy Water. Summary.)

Drinking distilled water is usually the best idea. (Robbins, Anthony. Unlimited Power. p 170-174. NY:Fireside, 1986.)

Water is the body’s main source of energy. Water flows through cell membranes providing electrical energy much like the turbines in a hydroelectric plant. Sufficient water is important in order for a person to have ongoing energy, especially during the aging process. (Batmanghelikj, F., MD. Your Body's Many Cries for Water. VA:Global Health Solutions, Inc.; Third Edition. 2008. Batmanghelikj, F., MD. Water: For Health, for Healing, for Life: You're Not Sick, You're Thirsty! NY:Grand Central Publishing, 2003.)

Water is the perfect means of energy transfer within biological systems, since water has the capacity to hold so much energy. (Jhon, Mu Shik, PhD. The Water Puzzle and the Hexagonal Key. p 39-40. UT:Uplifting Press, Inc., 2004. Translated from Korean by M. J. Pangman.)

Water is an essential nutrient without which human live cannot survive. Water deprivation kills faster than lack of any other nutrient. (Boeckner, Linda, and Kay McKinzie. Water: The Nutrient. Article.)

Water is absolutely essential for avoiding dehydration and yet many are chronically dehydrated. Some confuse thirst with hunger and eat instead of drinking water, which leads to weight gain. With age, people tend to lose thirst sensation and gradually become chronically dehydrated, and the body robs some areas of water to give it to other areas. (Brmanghelidj F. Your Body’s Many Cries for Water. VA:Global Health Solutions, 1992. Excerpt.)

Drink eight glasses of non-chlorinated water every day. Often people eat when they’re really thirsty rather than hungry. (Pert, Candace, PhD. Molecules of Emotion. p 323. NY: Scribner, 1997.)

Water is an essential nutrient without which human live cannot survive. Water deprivation kills faster than lack of any other nutrient. (Boeckner, Linda, and Kay McKinzie. Water: The Nutrient. Article.)

Water is not only a nutrient, it may ultimately be more important than other nutrients since without water even the best vitamins and minerals cannot be absorbed or made available for cellular processes. The University of Michigan recently released the Healing Food Pyramid. It places water at the bottom of the pyramid, the foundation “food” for health. (University of Michigan Integrative medicine Clinical Services, Healing Food Pyramid.)

A lack of water causes dehydration of red blood cells, making them less flexible, and they have a greater tendency to clot. Thicker, more viscous blood increases risk for stroke, heart disease, diabetes, kidney stones, and urinary tract infections. (Nedley, Neil, MD, and edited by David DeRose MD. Proof Positive – How to Reliably Combat Disease and Achieve Optimal Health through Nutrition and Lifestyle. OK: Nedley, 1998, 1999, pp 496-497)

Thirst can be defined as “sensations that initiate the identification and ingestion of fluids to meet hydration needs.” There is probably no single “thirst center” in the brain. Both excess thirst and diminished/absent thirst may indicate one of a number of health problems. The healthy human body is approximately 60% water. Thirst is triggered at about 2% body water deficit. On average, water intake per day should average 2000 to 3000 ml (including water intake from juice, milk, foods, etc.). Stressors such as exercise, sweating, and environmental temperature can increase water requirements. (Deahl, Thomas, D.M.D., PhD. Water, Thirst, & Dehydration. CA: Institute for Natural Resources, Health Update. 2009.)

Water is absolutely essential for avoiding dehydration and yet many are chronically dehydrated. Some confuse thirst with hunger and eat instead of drinking water, which leads to weight gain. With age, people tend to lose thirst sensation and gradually become chronically dehydrated, and the body robs some areas of water to give it to other areas. (Brmanghelidj F. Your Body’s Many Cries for Water. VA: Global Health Solutions, 1992. Excerpt.)

The younger the person, the greater the amount of total water movement or cell water turnover they experience. Generally an adult male will consume and discharge about 30 ml of water for each Kg of body weight (e.g., about 2.5 liters for a 175 lb male). Females consume and discharge 25 ml of water for each Kg of body weight. This turnover decreases with age.  (Jhon, Mu Shik, PhD. The Water Puzzle and the Hexagonal Key. p 69-72. UT: Uplifting Press, Inc., 2004. Translated from Korean by M. J. Pangman.)

Water plays a very important role in discharging metabolic waste from the body. (Jhon, Mu Shik, PhD. The Water Puzzle and the Hexagonal Key. p 39-40. UT: Uplifting Press, Inc., 2004. Translated from Korean by M. J. Pangman.)

This is really an inaccurate term although commonly used in reference to hydrocephalus. This condition results from too much CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) in the cavities (ventricles) of the brain. The brain produces about 1 pint of CSF each day. The old CSF is absorbed into blood vessels. If the process of replenishment and release of old CSF is disturbed, CSF levels can accumulate, causing hydrocephalus. (Source.)

Caloric beverages are generally less satiating than isocaloric foods. Persons interested in energy balance and weight control should, particularly when snacking, consume calories in food form. They are well advised to limit drinking to water. Even non-caloric sweetened beverages (e.g., diet sodas) may prompt consumption of additional calories later in the day. (Deahl, Thomas, D.M.D., PhD. Water, Thirst, & Dehydration. p 10. CA: Institute for Natural Resources, Health Update. 2009.) 

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