Computer/Phone

For many Americans, the internet has the potential to become an addiction that wreaks havoc at home, work, school, and in real-life relationships. There is both promise and peril in cyberspace (e.g., an increasing number of couples seeking marriage counseling from Greenfield were suffering from cyberspace-related problems). Provides strategies to help users maintain a balanced life, both on-line and off. ( Greenfield, David N., PhD. Virtual Addiction: Help for Netheads, Cyberfreaks, and Those Who Love Them. CA:New Harbinger Publications, 1999.) According to Dr. Orzack, a licensed clinical psychologist, founder and coordinator of McLean Hospital’s Computer Addiction Service and a member of the Harvard Medical school faculty, psychological and physical symptoms associated with addiction to computer / internet / video games may include the following:

  • Psychological Symptoms
    • Having a sense of well-being or euphoria while at the computer
    • Inability to stop the activity
    • Craving more and more time at the computer
    • Neglect of family and friends
    • Feeling empty, depressed, irritable when not at the computer
    • Lying to employers and family about activities
    • Problems with school or job
  • Physical Symptoms
    • Carpal tunnel syndrome
    • Dry eyes
    • Migraine headaches
    • Backaches
    • Eating irregularities, such as skipping meals
    • Failure to attend to personal hygiene
    • Sleep disturbances, change in sleep pattern

(Orzack, Maressa Hecht, PhD)

Studies have shown that sleep is independently linked with longevity and that modern technology affects sleep. For example, the artificial light from TV and computer screens affects melatonin production and throws off circadian rhythms, preventing deep, restorative sleep. New research at the University of Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska Academy has shed additional light on this topic. Sara Thomée, doctoral student, and colleagues conducted four studies to evaluate the effects of heavy computer and cell phone by young adults on sleep quality, stress levels, and general mental health. The studies found that young adults who make particularly heavy use of mobile phones and computers run a greater risk of sleep disturbances, stress, and symptoms of mental health. Heavy use of mobile phones was linked to an increase in sleeping problems in males and an increase in depressive symptoms in both males and females.

(http://gupea.ub.gu.se/handle/2077/28245  University of Gothenburg. "Intensive mobile phone use affects young people's sleep." ScienceDaily, 11 June 2012. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120611134233.htm )

Studies by Sara Thomée, doctoral student, and colleagues at the University of Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska Academy have shown links between frequent computer use without breaks and late at night and health problems. For example:

  • Frequent computer use without breaks was found to increase the risk of stress, sleeping problems, and depressive symptoms in women
  • Males who use computers extensively without breaks were more likely to develop sleeping problems.

Regularly using a computer late at night was associated not only with sleep disorders but also with stress and depressive symptoms in both men and women.
(http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-volpi-md-pc-facs/technology-depression_b_1723625.html. Accessed 7-16)

Studies by Sara Thomée, doctoral student, and colleagues at the University of Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska Academy have shown links between frequent computer use without breaks and late at night and health problems. For example:

  • Frequent computer use without breaks was found to increase the risk of stress, sleeping problems, and depressive symptoms in women
  • Males who use computers extensively without breaks were more likely to develop sleeping problems.

Regularly using a computer late at night was associated not only with sleep disorders but also with stress and depressive symptoms in both men and women.

(http://gupea.ub.gu.se/handle/2077/28245; https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120611134233.htm)

Sara Thomée, doctoral student at the University of Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska Academy and colleagues conducted four studies to evaluate the effects of heavy computer and cell phone by young adults on sleep quality, stress levels, and general mental health. The studies found that young adults who make particularly heavy use of mobile phones and computers run a greater risk of sleep disturbances, stress, and symptoms of mental health. Heavy use of mobile phones was linked to an increase in sleeping problems in males and an increase in depressive symptoms in both males and females. (University of Gothenburg. "Intensive mobile phone use affects young people's sleep." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 June 2012.  Accessed 7-16  <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120611134233.htm>)

Studies by Sara Thomée, doctoral student, and colleagues at the University of Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska Academy have shown links between frequent computer use without breaks and late at night and health problems. For example:

  • Frequent computer use without breaks was found to increase the risk of stress, sleeping problems, and depressive symptoms in women
  • Males who use computers extensively without breaks were more likely to develop sleeping problems.

Regularly using a computer late at night was associated not only with sleep disorders but also with stress and depressive symptoms in both men and women
(http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-volpi-md-pc-facs/technology-depression_b_1723625.html. Accessed 7-16)

Sara Thomée, doctoral student at the University of Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska Academy and colleagues conducted four studies to evaluate the effects of heavy computer and cell phone by young adults on sleep quality, stress levels, and general mental health. The studies found that young adults who make particularly heavy use of mobile phones and computers run a greater risk of sleep disturbances, stress, and symptoms of mental health. Heavy use of mobile phones was linked to an increase in sleeping problems in males and an increase in depressive symptoms in both males and females. (University of Gothenburg. "Intensive mobile phone use affects young people's sleep." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 June 2012.  Accessed 7-16  <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120611134233.htm>)

Sara Thomée, doctoral student at the University of Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska Academy and colleagues conducted four studies to evaluate the effects of heavy computer and cell phone by young adults on sleep quality, stress levels, and general mental health. The studies found that young adults who make particularly heavy use of mobile phones and computers run a greater risk of sleep disturbances, stress, and symptoms of mental health. Heavy use of mobile phones was linked to an increase in sleeping problems in males and an increase in depressive symptoms in both males and females. (University of Gothenburg. "Intensive mobile phone use affects young people's sleep." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 June 2012.  Accessed 7-16 <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120611134233.htm>)

Studies by Sara Thomée, doctoral student, and colleagues at the University of Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska Academy have shown links between frequent computer use without breaks and late at night and health problems. For example:

  • Frequent computer use without breaks was found to increase the risk of stress, sleeping problems, and depressive symptoms in women
  • Males who use computers extensively without breaks were more likely to develop sleeping problems.

Regularly using a computer late at night was associated not only with sleep disorders but also with stress and depressive symptoms in both men and women. (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-volpi-md-pc-facs/technology-depression_b_1723625.html. Accessed 7-16)

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